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X-T2 should i buy it.


Ron1978

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I thought about getting the X-T2 just for the joystick - but decided this was insane as I'm still happy with my X-E2.

 

But small things like the ability to easily move the focus point means a lot when we use a camera every day.

 

The flip out screen would also be handy.

 

I don't think any of the other advances in the X-T2 would make any difference to my photos - but how a camera handles is important, and possibly the reason many of us use Fuji bodies.

 

Yes, the joystick is a lot faster. That in itself will change some of the pics you may capture.........winning moments.

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I had such a joystick on my Canon ... I didn't use it much. So for me it's a bit of a gimmick.

I do understand that for others it may be essential, so I'm not discounting the idea.

 

Now if they came up with real improvements to the internal RAW processor (like being able to store presets), or with the option to give proper names to the custom settings (and being able to export and import them) ... that would be useful for me!

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I had such a joystick on my Canon ... I didn't use it much. So for me it's a bit of a gimmick.

I do understand that for others it may be essential, so I'm not discounting the idea.

 

Now if they came up with real improvements to the internal RAW processor (like being able to store presets), or with the option to give proper names to the custom settings (and being able to export and import them) ... that would be useful for me!

 

I find it particularly useful in two areas, when using af servo to chase down subject (kids, sports, races) and when using single shot to frame the subject correctly without employing the focus, recompose, shoot method. The FRS method is too slow for some shots where the subject moves quickly and has a higher chance of mis-focusing. Sometimes it's so quick that I literally forget to breathe.

 

The AF joysticks is otherwise redundant if you take slow moving, static subjects or pre focused street photography.

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The AF joysticks is otherwise redundant if you take slow moving, static subjects or pre focused street photography.

That's mainly what I do.

 

I do shift the focus point regularly, but that's usually for static compositions.

 

Probably my requirements will change when we get grandchildren, but that will still take a few years ;)

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makes one wonder how did fathers ( unfortunately I din’t  have any grandfather who was alive in the ’50 or ‘60 ) ever took pictures of children running about before the invention of autofocus camera and even before digital cameras when film was expensive and missing many shots would have been a costly hobby.

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It's different. Both are good but in different ways.

 

If you compare Pro1 and T2, the game changer won't be the pic quality but will be the AF and video, if it matters to you.

Yeah as I'm already satisfied with the IQ from the X-Pro1 the main things I look forward to and how I justify the upgrade is: 

 

*AF speed, AF accuracy (especially in continues focus) and new AF modes 

*Huge VF and fast refresh rate 

*Flipout screen (for odd angles, had a lot of use of this with my old Canon 70D)

*Joy stick (hate having to press down first and then using dpad on xpro1 to move AF point, feels clumsy)

*Ergonomics

*More film simulations (I shot a lot in JPEG with FUJI and enjoy their simulations)

*Higher resolutions for more cropping abilities

*4k. Although I don't film a lot, I'm sure I will enjoy it when I use it. But I guess I need a 4k screen first?

 

I hope it will be close to be as discreet and unobtrusive as the X-Pro1  

Edited by Hermelin
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I wonder how the X-T2 compares to the 6D in terms of AF.

 

In my country you can now get a brand new 6D with the 24-70 f/4 lens for slightly less of the cost than the the X-T2 with the 18-55 f/2.8-4 Or the 6D and the 24-105 L + 50 f/1.8 STM for slightly less than the X-T2 and 18-55. Kinda tempting.

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I liked the 6D but focus was hit and miss in daylight and I only used the centre spot. In the dark the -3ev did well compared to previous cameras. Am still amazed when I use the 35 1.4 at 1.4 on the X-T1 and get sharp crystal clear eyelashes. I have never had that sort of focus accuracy on a DSLR with wide open prime lenses (and I have had all sorts of L lenses). The X-T2 with -3EV focus, double card slots, faster auto focus, improved ISO and the focus spot controller stick make it a must for me and will make working a lot easier. An X-E3 will be a very interesting bargain buy if it has some/all of this stuff.

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I'd buy an X_E2s or X-E2 (even a used one) over the XT2 or even the XT10 if I were a "newbie"

then you have money left over for lenses. 

 

As for "growing into a camera"..You could spend the next 5 years growing into an X-E1 or an X100s

and graduate to the XT5, by then you'll be tired of all the gear and carrying stuff around and use your phone :) 

 

After years of GAS (gear acquisition syndrome I sold my Canon's, Sony's,  Panasonics and all I have is the X-E2 which I LOVE, and a X100 that I am selling to finance a new lens. (classified here in classifieds).

 

Im a pro and on jobs I rent a Canon if I need one but get by with the X-E2 most of the time. 

 

The X-E2 with a 35mm f2 lens or the new 23mm f2 lens is also a small package you can carry around. you might not want to carry an XT1 or 2 around if that's what you do.  

 

X-E2 over XT10 because the viewfinder is larger and over on the side so you're not smashing your face/ nose on the LCD all the time. 

 

Good luck

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The decision to give up my X-T1 and to pre-order the X-T2 was not one that was easy to make.  I love the X-T1 and everything about it.  I does everything that I need from my camera.  I don't need 24MP or 14 FPS, and I can live without Acros film simulation.  But.......my X-T1 is just now 2 years old and I have had the rubber surface replaced twice in the first 12 months, and a now a third time in the last year.  All have been covered N/C by Fuji as a warranty service.  They have also replaced the accessory door, and sent me an additional replacement. My camera has very light usage and never abused.  As much as I love it, I no longer have confidence that these failures won't continue to happen on the X-T1.  I do not want to have to return the body ever 6 months for repair.

Consequently my sad solution, although expensive, was to replace the X-T1 and hope that all of these issues have now been resolved with the newer model.

I know this is not the experience of everyone..... just mine.

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The main question is, "Do you shoot for a living, and if yes, what kind of photography is it that you do?" I have found that if you enter a system at the top tier of a manufactures camera selection you'll probably never regret it so long as the lens selection and sensor resolution meet your minimum needs. A camera like the X-T2 should cover your daily needs 90% for several years, but the wonderful X-T1 which I presently use and the cost/value X-T10 are beginning to show their age, all be it only slightly. You can't make an X-T1 or X-T10 perform as well as a X-T2, but you can make an X-T2 or an X-Pro 2 pretty much do anything you want and more as you grow as a photographer. In a few weeks I'll be up grading, my business demands it, but I must admit that my X-T1 is like a member of my family and selling it would be painful. I think it's going to be going into a water housing and will now specialize in wave work. Good luck in your choice, and it's nice to know you've chosen Fujifilm for your future photography. Everyone here will tell you that will be your best move by far.

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If you are a person who absolutely has to have the "best," get the X-T2. You will regret anything else. Of course, the best will only be best until the next model comes out.

 

If you are just looking for an excellent camera, I'd recommend the X-T10, which is what I'm using (Along with an X-E2). Extra megapixels are fun to count when buying, but truthfully, any currently produced interchangeable lens camera on the market today can give you excellent results. Good lenses are the first place to put your money. They hold their value better than a camera body, which is basically a computer. There will be a faster, better one out in a year or two anyway.

 

I bought the X-Pro2, this spring, and sent it back. Couldn't justify the price. My prints didn't look any better. Yes, higher pixel count on the new cameras could be an advantage. But you will have to print really big to gain that. I recently printed a print at 16x24 inches from the X-E2 that I entered in a regional juried art show. It was the only photo in the event to win an award. (BTW, I came to Fuji from Nikon and sold a D800 to fund my purchase - my prints still look good). Don't print big? You only need 4 megapixels for any online use. Need to crop often? Buy a longer lens and learn to come close to your final crop in camera. That's what pros do. Except paparazzi, experts seldom count on cropping their shots.

 

Need to shoot video? Do you shoot it now? If not, then video is just an idea.

 

Need water-sealing? I live in the Pacific Northwest and shoot almost every day of the year. I've never had problems with a non-sealed camera. Keeping your camera dry is just a skill that's easily learned. A good camera bag should be enough for almost all situations. A bread bag and rubber band are my emergency "weather sealing."

 

The simple truth is that, as a beginner, you don't know what you want. You don't know your shooting style or even goals. You may think you do, but for 99% of people, those change as you gain experience. So, my general advice to people who ask if they should buy a top of the line camera is no. Get something you can grow with. When you really know how you shoot and what you shoot, then you don't have to ask anybody what camera to get. You'll know on your own. And if you get the X-T10 you'll have saved over half the price of a new X-T2.

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From my point of view, I would focus either on the XP2 or the XT2. I know you have set sight on the XT2. To be frank Fuji cameras are easy to acclimatise to and you will not be overwhelm. Focus purely on what your heart have set sight on and you will be happy using and buying it. Say if you have the means to it, head out and purchase it. There's no point asking around, since people have different opinions that may not best suit your needs, tendency for you to second guess. In the event that you have no means to it at present, my advise, be patient and save up. You will never regret it.

 

With regards to lenses, the three lenses which will suffice for one needs, would be the 16mmf1.4, 35mmf2 and either the 56mmf1.2 or 90mmf2 or best wait for the 50mmf2. The 56mmf1.2 render great bokeh but autofocus seems quite quirky though. Go for a second hand if i were you amid users selling it for the 90mmf2 or the upcoming 50mmf2. Then again there will never be lenses that will suffice in photography world. It is just a guideline.

 

Do take a look at the XP2 as well. To be honest its one great camera. Never understood, when users quoted " a camera with a soul ", initially. After toying with it at a camera store and during a fuji photowalk, i got to say its the most enjoyable camera i've toyed with so far. Much more joy to use than the XT1 that i have owned. Sold off my XT1 recently to fund for either the XT2 or XP2. Never enjoyed using it. Autofocus was the driving factor that made me sold it off. Then again, no camera is perfect. XP2 has it quirkiness, so will the XT2, but its up to the users themselves to overlook its shortcomings in favour of its positive functionality, ergonomics and joy to use.

 

From my perspective, either the XT2 or XP2 is a good enough camera for me, for my type of photography. You don't need to keep changing bodies every now and then unless you find it necessary to the type of photography you are into. Say if you are a photographer or looking to be one and a means of your main income, then its justifiable to keep updating bodies, as one has to please their clients with image qualities, less if its for personal, it should be good enough. Invest more in lenses you need than bodies.

 

That being said, have fun, all the best and happy shooting.

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I feel like waiting for the XE-3 right now. X-T2 is overkill for me and I can't justify paying that much for a cam for my everyday shooting which is mostly just family candid shots, travel shots and some landscape and street photography.

 

I'll wait for the xe3 which will be more than suffice for me as long as it has flip out screen and joystick.

Edited by Hermelin
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The decision to give up my X-T1 and to pre-order the X-T2 was not one that was easy to make.  I love the X-T1 and everything about it.  I does everything that I need from my camera.  I don't need 24MP or 14 FPS, and I can live without Acros film simulation.  But.......my X-T1 is just now 2 years old and I have had the rubber surface replaced twice in the first 12 months, and a now a third time in the last year.  All have been covered N/C by Fuji as a warranty service.  They have also replaced the accessory door, and sent me an additional replacement. My camera has very light usage and never abused.  As much as I love it, I no longer have confidence that these failures won't continue to happen on the X-T1.  I do not want to have to return the body ever 6 months for repair.

Consequently my sad solution, although expensive, was to replace the X-T1 and hope that all of these issues have now been resolved with the newer model.

I know this is not the experience of everyone..... just mine.

 

You'll probably love the X-T2 more than your X-T1. All of my friends who did so have no regrets. Absolutely none.

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makes one wonder how did fathers ( unfortunately I din’t  have any grandfather who was alive in the ’50 or ‘60 ) ever took pictures of children running about before the invention of autofocus camera and even before digital cameras when film was expensive and missing many shots would have been a costly hobby.

 

Zone focusing?

 

I think one thing lead to another in our era of photography. I would blame mainly two things, fast lenses and extreme focus accuracy. In the name of better subject isolation and a not so ideal environment, these two attributes may increase the chance of a good photograph.

 

I've had a weekend in Singapore shooting with the Samyang 12mm. At certain aperture, there is hardly any need for focus accuracy. However, the background and composition had to be of some interest. There was no chance for subject isolation in a rather busy environment. Hence, it had to depend on other attributes and not AF speed or accuracy.

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Zone focusing?

 

I think one thing lead to another in our era of photography. I would blame mainly two things, fast lenses and extreme focus accuracy. In the name of better subject isolation and a not so ideal environment, these two attributes may increase the chance of a good photograph.

 

I've had a weekend in Singapore shooting with the Samyang 12mm. At certain aperture, there is hardly any need for focus accuracy. However, the background and composition had to be of some interest. There was no chance for subject isolation in a rather busy environment. Hence, it had to depend on other attributes and not AF speed or accuracy.

 

 

As one of the old folks who shot for years without autofocus, I'll answer. Yes, zone focus is part of the process. I imagine that you've heard the old saw, "f/8 and be there," that is in part a zone focus technique. It works well with shorter focal length lenses.

 

The other half of the equation is simply getting used to manual focusing quickly. It's a skill, and it's at least as fast as the autofocus on the X-Pro1. It's amazing what can be done with manual exposure and focus. Why, we even managed to get a photo in focus at least once a year.

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As one of the old folks who shot for years without autofocus, I'll answer. Yes, zone focus is part of the process. I imagine that you've heard the old saw, "f/8 and be there," that is in part a zone focus technique. It works well with shorter focal length lenses.

 

The other half of the equation is simply getting used to manual focusing quickly. It's a skill, and it's at least as fast as the autofocus on the X-Pro1. It's amazing what can be done with manual exposure and focus. Why, we even managed to get a photo in focus at least once a year.

 

Thank you Michael. I read your post with renewed enthusiasm and humor!

 

I agree it's definitely skill. I started learning to shoot on film and had a very patient teacher. He always told me, practice, practice, practice!

 

I find the AF on the Pro1 plenty fast. :)

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