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  1. jerry, I think I understand after reading the post above by FX Admin ... the message warns me that, when CL / CH and ES or ES + MS are enabled, the camera will not focus on each shot thanks anyway
    1 point
  2. Michele Bonelli

    000008977 NC.jpg

    From the album: Paesaggi

    1 point
  3. Michele Bonelli

    00009764 blend a.jpg

    From the album: Paesaggi

    1 point
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  5. I've not yet had the chance to build a linux(ish) box to try this (I doubt a modest RPi has the necessary horsepower) but I take your point completely concerning port clogging on shared usb devices at high bandwidth. I will persevere, because it is an interesting project. I suppose HDMI out to a decent quality converter is probably a much simpler, off-the-shelf solution, subject to the same usb caveats. At the risk of sounding like a broken record though (for those of us who remember them) all of this could probably be resolved with a small firmware tweak by Fuji. I live in hope.
    1 point
  6. I do think that this approach (webcam over usb) should be taken with a view of what the physical limits impose. The X-T30 uses the usb 3 standard which has a theoretical 5.0gb limit — if you plug it into a similar type port on your computer, etc. You can easily run into problems if your computer is sharing that port with other usb devices while trying to push full screen, deep bit-depth, high frame rate video while trying to use those other devices, — your computer may bog down or at least have problems including dropping frames or stuttering. Setting smaller sizes, slower rates, lower bit depth, etc. may be a better choice. Even better, use the HDMI connector. You start off with over 10gb data transfer, (this is the starting point, notice the usb connector speed is “up to” which means you normally get that only under ideal circumstances). This may be troublesome if the webcam software expects the camera on the usb port, a lot of those usb webcams are not high quality video capture devices.
    1 point
  7. Thanks for the response, much appreciated, and it looks like I need to go and do some exploring with gphoto. Hopefully that will provide some level of functionality, although it does seem our efforts to tether the X-T30 could be greatly streamlined with a little help from Fuji!
    1 point
  8. The image captures are strictly video only. As i mentioned, single image capture is not (yet) implemented, though these functions should be feasible in other programs based upon having the features available in the Remote Camera App. for example, gphoto2 --list-config lists a toggle switch that turns bulb capture mode on or off, but it is currently set to read-only mode. GPhoto2 is a front end for libgphoto2. The library itself is usually used by the various applications such as the KStars program I wrote about. Those programs tend to not give you direct access to the commands they use, but you can use gphoto2 to get at those: http://gphoto.org/doc/remote/ The documentation is a little open-ended as many open source projects tend to be. You will need to scroll all the way to the end of the page i linked to in my reply to YOUTA to find out the maintainer has added the X-T30's live view capabilities to their listing, but the general documentation has not been updated to reflect that. The camera uses the PTP language, so your system may need a generic PTP camera driver to go outside of the Zoom world. I used it in KStars EKOS module to record live view video, the program automatically turned it into the .ser format, and saved it. All i had to do was click on the start / stop buttons. This was with the camera's Connection Setting set to X Webcam, I have not tried the other USB video options (I have read those are there for controlling the camera using gimbals, etc.).
    1 point
  9. Hi Jerryy Interesting, and I’m glad that you found a method to support X-T30 video capture. My experience has been far less positive and I would appreciate any thoughts you may have. Firstly, I found that the introduction of webcam support in firmware 1.40 did allow me to use the X-T30, but only in limited applications. For example, when connected and configured as per Fuji instructions, the camera would be recognised and usable with Zoom video conferencing. But, it was not available as a generic webcam to any other apps. For example, VLC could not pick it up as a functioning source. Also, websites where I granted camera access could not obtain any image from the camera. I have not applied the 1.41 firmware update as the release notes didn’t seem to indicate any further webcam functionality. I am not sure that the lack of webcam support on this camera is a ‘windows’ problem as you suggest, but I suspect it is a crippling of functionality within the X-T30 firmware to maintain differentiation of features between this camera and other Fuji models. However, I would be happy to be proved wrong! You mentioned your experience of additional webcam support in firmware 1.41 and successful image captures with gphoto2, I would be very interested in this – can you let me know what functionality you get with gphoto2 and X-T30 because I see on the gphoto.org website that it doesn’t seem to have any support for this model? Thanks in advance
    1 point
  10. This sounds like a Windows problem, it works in Linux and as far as I have tested, macOS. I have used KStars with my X-T30 to record videos as .ser files which then can be stacked in programs such as FireCapture. I got the linux setup working first on my desktop system (Mint) and then on my Raspberry Pi (Astroberry) and then a brief test on my mac system. If you can get gphoto2 to run on your Windows box, this command: gphoto2 --capture-movie --stdout | ffplay - will put up a movie in the viewer for you. I am still waiting for single frame capture — that would help me cut out the current clunky way of using remote camera app as a go between. https://github.com/gphoto/gphoto2/issues/196
    1 point
  11. SLA

    Red-footed Falcon

    From the album: Nature

    © © Sam Lantz

    1 point
  12. jlmphotos

    Colorado-501804.jpg

    © © Jorge L Moro 2021

    1 point
  13. I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market. (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'. (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony. By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-). So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
    1 point
  14. The RP is "full frame" like all those '90s era stereo receivers that were "digital ready." Its made of plastic, not WR, its DR is poor, AF nothing special; its sensor tech is generations behind even for Canon. It lacks IBIS, in addition to anything like the full scan 4K of the X-T4. A more apt comparison would be to the R6, which is a pretty compelling camera-except for the part where it's most of a grand more than a T4. And then there's RF glass which, while optically stellar, makes Fuji lenses seem downright thrifty in price. Fuji makes really great APS-C cameras, and really great medium format cameras. Lots of companies make really great full frame cameras, so I think Fuji is in the right to go the way they are.
    1 point
  15. MarcelMartinez

    Jaguar

    1 point
  16. For portraits: the 110mm is gorgeous at F2.0 and 2.8, best portrait lens I've ever had and I rate it 10/10. Everyone expects a lot from the new 80mm too. The 250mm is also really nice for portraits, 8,5/10. The 50mm is said to be slightly better than the 45mm which I have and rate 7,5/10. The 30mm I haven't used very much yet, 7-8/10 for the moment. The 63mm is OK but nothing really special, a 7/10. The 120mm is really sharp, could be good for landscape but a no-go for portraits. I had the 32-64mm, it's really sharp but has -imho- no character, 5/10. I really dislike zooms so I'm totally biased .
    1 point
  17. XF lenses do not work on GFX cameras. Their image circle isn't large enough to cover the sensor. An APS-C lens covers about 25% of a GFX sensor. Some full frame lenses work with a GFX but only restricted to a smaller part of the image (about 70% of the GFX sensor). I've worked with the GFX50S and shortly with the GFX100 for fashion and portraits. The combination of the 32-64 and the 110 works very well. Alternative is the 45-100. For landscape I can recommend the 23. Combine that with the 45-100 and you have a nice kit covering most. You also mention longer glass (XF50-140). Note that for GFX there's essentially one longer prime lens: the GF250, which is a bit shorter than 140mm in APS-C equiv.) and one zoom: the 100-200 (a bit over 100mm in APS-C). Both are massive and quite a burden to carry around. Fuji claims that the GFX100S is only slightly larger than a full frame mirrorless, but that's only half the story. When you take the lenses into account it is considerably larger and heavier to carry around compared to full frame. Although the GFX platform by design is well-suited for landscape, there's only one native real landscape lens (23). I guess there's room for a wider lens there. There are some third party options but at a lower quality standard (and price level).
    1 point
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  19. SLA

    Fern Forest

    From the album: Nature

    1 point
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