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jerryy

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Everything posted by jerryy

  1. George!!! I tried to keep it brief, I thought you would have more to say.
  2. For the second one, ..., anytime your shutter speed is slower than the lens’s focal length, there is a pretty good chance of getting a little bit of camera shake — even a slight amount will show up in photos such as this one. This is where having Optical Image Stabilization turned on will help steady things and give you a better chance of getting the photo you want. There is a switch on the lens that needs to be set to the on position in order for OIS to function — it can be easily turned off for times when you do not want it such as when using a tripod. Then, in the setup menu there is an option for you to choose how to engage the OIS ‘motor’. You can set it to be always on, which uses more battery, or you can set it to turn on only when you half press the shutter button.
  3. This stores the value you entered into the EXIF data. That can be useful if at some point in the future you want to remind yourself which focal length (lens) you used to get that image. Additionally, if your raw converter allows you to use custom lens profiles during the conversion process, this information already being in the data can save you some time by selecting the appropriate one for you. The lens profile can contain information regarding how much vignetting the lens has for a given f-stop, how flat or fish-eyed a lens is, etc. Many raw converters have some generic profiles they use for lens that cover a wide variety of settings. It does no harm to leave it empty, filling it in and remembering to use may give you some extra options.
  4. You are wanting to trade a group of lenses that in good condition are selling for over US$ 2000 for one lens that cost brand new US$ 1500. Why not just take them to your local camera shop and make the trade, or swap them through the various on line camera stores?
  5. If your lens is set to Aperture Priority — the switch is moved to the A position for those that have it, or the menu choice is turned on for those that do not have it — the camera will only allow a maximum shutter speed of 30 seconds in any of the T or B settings. Turn off Aperture Priority and you can use bulb settings that go much longer. The bad news is in T shutter speed mode, the maximum is still going to be 30 seconds. You can get an intervalometer, connect it to your camera via the external release jack, set the camera shutter to B mode and use the intervalometer to give you the timed longer sequences, or use a remote release switch and a watch.
  6. jerryy

    Reptiles

    I came across this critter sunning itself on a bike path / walkway: Autumn is a rough time for reptiles. It is not cold enough for them to find a place to nap over the winter, but the cold mornings make them sluggish. So they crawl out the the hot spots trying to warm up.
  7. It can be, if you are shooting a single exposure. If you are shooting a sequence, then things get more complicated. Here is a better explanation: https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/635338-long-exposure-noise-reduction-vs-dark-frame-subtraction/
  8. I do not have any good thoughts about how to stop the hot pixels from showing up, but there are noise reduction techniques from astrophotography that may help your images until you are able to get the hardware issue resolved. Right after taking a long exposure shot (or sequence) put the lens cap back on and take another image at the very same settings you used for the long exposure shot. in your image editing software, put this dark frame as a layer directly above your good image layer. Set the blend mode for the dark frame to “Subtract”. That should take care of a lot of the minor issues and help towardcthe major ones. Another possibility is to set the blend mode to “Difference” and play with the layer’s opacity setting. These do depend on whether or not your image processing software allow you to do that sort of thing.
  9. A view from a roadside stop: Autumn is strolling on in.
  10. No, it is "just as fast". I use a Canon 50mm f1.4 and a Canon mount long lens with an adapter and you would need decent electronic measuring equipment in a lab setting to detect any significant af speed difference between using the lenses on a Canon body instead of a Fujifilm body. If you look on other sites as that have Fujifilm forums, there are shooters that post images of birds in flight, landing and taking-off, dogs in motion, race cars, etc. all down with long lenses through an adapter. Or, to put it another way, no noticeable delay. That said, it also depends on the body and the lens. Fujifilm's fastest body will not make a slow af lens auto focus any faster.
  11. Yes, it works. There is no change in the crop factor — it is still the.1.5 ratio of full frame to aps-c. That part is tougher to answer, it depends on whether you want to use the lens in fully manual mode, or you want to use things like af, having the lens’ exif data reported in the file, etc. There are are adapters that are essentially manual connectors that do no more than let you connect the lenses to the body with nothing else enabled and there are adapters than give you full electronic control — as long as the lens had it to begin with. There is a company called Fringer that you can look into, there are others you can find by using your favorite search engine to search for Canon ef to Fujifilm fx adapters (or any variations on that).
  12. Does the focus jump when you are looking through the view finder? If so, it sounds like you have the touch screen focus point select turned on. Turn this off in the main menu Button/Dial Setting >> Touch Screen and the focus should stop bouncing around.
  13. Possibly the least expensive route is to get screw on filters for your (anticipated) widest lens -- ehh the 82 mm if I recall correctly and then use what are called step-up rings to attach the smaller sized lens to the filter. Be careful not to accidentally get step-down rings, these go in the opposite direction and will not work for what you are wanting to do. The square filter holders are often used in situations calling for graduated neutral density -- gnd -- filters, where the bottom part of the filter has no effect on the image. (It keeps the sky from being blown out without over darkening the land part. ) You slide the filter up or down in the holder to suit your setting. The same idea about sizes would apply here. Get one that will work for your largest lens and use step-up rings to attach it to your smaller lenses.
  14. (I copied this from the other thread) Plug in your camera to your Mac, turn it on, open your Applications folder and start the program called Image Capture. Its main window has a left hand menu called DEVICES and another one called SHARED. The Devices menu will have your camera listed and you can bring in images to your drive. https://support.apple.com/guide/image-capture/welcome/mac Note: to be complete, you can set default folders and have scripts that do if-then tasks, etc. etc. but that is way beyond getting you up and running quickly
  15. I guess we are stuck in this one until a moderator moves the thread :) Plug in your camera to your Mac, turn it on, open your Applications folder and start the program called Image Capture. Its main window has a left hand menu called DEVICES and another one called SHARED. The Devices menu will have your camera listed and you can bring in images to your drive. https://support.apple.com/guide/image-capture/welcome/mac Note: to be complete, you can set default folders and have scripts the do if-then tasks, etc. etc. but that is way beyond getting you up and running quickly.
  16. You. may get a better answer posting your question in one of the forums related to the camera body you have. If you have a recent camera body, you can go to the menu for pc connection and choose usb card reader, save the choices, and restart the camera after plugging the cable into your computer. You can then use Apple’s built-in Camera Import software to copy the files to your drive. Or get a usb card reader, put the sd card in it, connect the reader to your computer and use the finder to copy the files.
  17. Not really a tetraptych, not really a panorama, but along those lines... (part two)
  18. Not really a tetraptych, not really a panorama, but along those lines... (part one)
  19. Among the various lens and camera settings it also records beyond just the sensor data, the raw file includes the film simulation information you use for your jpeg files large image and preview sizes (embedded thumbnail). Some raw converters use this to give you an initial idea of what the image looks like. Depending on which converter you have, you can change that film simulation, but the jpeg thumbnail removal is not recommended because the other converters cannot open the file without that preview information.
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