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Herco

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Herco last won the day on November 24

Herco had the most liked content!

About Herco

  • Birthday 05/26/1962

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    Switzerland
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    Portrait, fashion, fine-art, (urban) landscape

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  1. I'm in exactly the same position. For professional work I've moved away from Fujifilm, but for personal work I still love the X-Pro2 form factor. The X-Pro3 indeed misses the point for me. Next to a number of improvements (faster AF, better EVF, placement of the diopter adjustment and exposure comp dial) there are some crucial misses for me: the sub screen is nothing but a gimmick and looks cheap on this camera. The tilting screen is exactly the wrong implementation, whereas the X100V is exactly right if you want a tilting screen at all. Same for the ISO dial. But the main issue for me was dropping the X-Pro2 dual magnification in the OVF rendering the X-Pro3 OVF useless for anything wider than 23mm or longer than 50mm. So I returned the X-Pro3 I had on trial and kept using my X-Pro2 (although I mostly use my M10-R and Q2 nowadays). Now, the X-Pro models have always been niche cameras for Fujifilm. Therefore the launch of newer models followed roughly a 4 year cycle. So, logic dictates that we should expect a new model around Oct 2023. If at all, because a friendly retailer (one of the larger online ones in Europe) told me that X-Pro3 sales were initially good due to X-Pro2 owners replacing their camera, but dropped sharply thereafter and is now way under previous X-Pro2 levels. As said before, this is a niche camera in a rapidly shrinking market (digital camera sales dropped between 2011 and 2021 by over 90%) and it's a rather expensive one too. Priced in 'full-frame territory'. Potential buyers love the looks, but buy an X-T3/T4 (of a full-frame compact like the Z5, A7C or S5) because it's more convenient with better options. What doesn't help is that the newer f1.4 lenses (the 18, 23 and 33) are all substantially bigger and render the OVF on the X-Pro's useless, while at the same time some of the crucial compact lenses (the 16/f2.8 and the 23/f2) in terms of pure image quality are not Fuji's best. Long story short, the X-Pro3 is a rather expensive niche camera with the relative low sales numbers to match that. If at all, the successor isn't likely to be expected before end 2023.
  2. The 'humming' sound is that of the IBIS unit. Even when turned off, it still remains active to keep the sensor in a fixed position. The X-H1 has a similar sound, but a bit louder due to a different construction.
  3. You should indeed use circular polarizing filters (and not linear). Also on a mirrorless digital camera. The quality of a CPL is crucial. 'Cheap' CPLs can ruin your lens performance. Pick one from a reputable brand. It might cost a bit more, but it's visibly worth it in terms of less color shifts, better sharpness and contrast.
  4. The sensor itself is usually quite reliable. It is often the hardware or software around it that fails (firmware, connectors, batteries, motherboards...) and can cause erratic behavior. Oxidation can be a cause of problems and the GFX platform has some weak spots for that (read Roger Cicala's blogpost on Lensrentals about the GFX100). Other 'known issues' are read/write errors to card slots causing images not being stored. My advice is to check for the latest firmware and install that. Make sure that the battery is fully charged. Then completely reset the camera to factory settings and try it out. If that seems to solve the issues, configure the camera as you want and test again. If either step doesn't solve the issues, you probably need to bring it in for service. Also make sure that whenever a lens is attached you see the correct aperture being displayed and not 'f0' (which is an error message for malfunctioning camera/lens contact).
  5. I think you mean the Image Display function that allows you to review the image after you've taken it? First of all, the image is usually only displayed on the back LCD panel, not in the viewfinder regardless of OVF or EVF. If and if so for how long it will be displayed is a setting in the SET UP/SCREEN SET UP menu. From OFF, via 0.5s and 1.5s to Continuous, meaning until you half press the shutter release button according the manual. There's a catch though. When you have the view mode of the viewfinder set to 'eye sensor' and take your eye away from the viewfinder to view the LCD and you move back to the viewfinder, the image display also disappears as if you half pressed the shutter release button. The second catch is that only when you've disabled the LCD in the view mode, the Image Display will be in the view finder, regardless whether in OVF or EVF mode. In that situation the eye sensor doesn't act as a half press of the shutter release button. I suggest that you take some tests with the Image Display set to Continuous and varying between EVF and OVF as well as the view mode of the VF/LCD. You may have changed a setting that leads to the unexpected behavior.
  6. There are a few major differences between the T3 and the T4 and only you can decide how important these are for you. The T4 has in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a bigger battery, a slightly more pronounced grip and an articulating screen over the T3. In terms of image quality, EVF and AF there's no difference between the cameras (after firmware update 4.xx). As you state that you will create video content the IBIS and the battery life can be real benefit. Whether the articulating screen of the T4 is a must-have for you, depends on whether you record yourself or not. For normal photographic use I'd prefer the 2-axis tilting screen of the T3, but this is very personal. The IBIS of the T4 is a significant advantage when you shoot video or low-light photography. Not to be underestimated unless you're a tripod-user. The battery of the T4 lasts about twice as long as the smaller T3 battery. Think about 45-60 min in video record mode in the T3 and 90-110 min for the T4. Additional spare batteries for the T3 are cheaper to buy though and a battery grip with two spare batteries mitigates the difference. Personally, if I were to do significant video work, I'd always opt for the T4 and buy if needed a pre-owned 35/f2. You could even consider the cheaper XC35/f2 rather than the XF35/f2. There's no difference in image quality, just in construction and aperture ring. Note that for video work the 35/f2 has quite heavy focus breathing. When that is a concern, you might want to opt for the 23/f2. For photography only, I'd prefer the T3 for it's 2-axis tilting screen. When the T3 deal includes the 35/f2, I'd consider it a very good deal. This lens is usually $350 new and $250 pre-owned (depending on the market).
  7. I have had an early X100V too, but to my knowledge there is no recall action for the overheating issue. At least not in Europe. There's 'just' the firmware update that shifts the temperature point before switching-off occurs. I wouldn't know whether there is actually a repair possible without structural alterations to the camera. The hardware is hard to change I would assume.
  8. Unfortunately there is not. On the X-T4 there are two options re. the focus ring. One is about the direction of rotation (CW versus CCW). The other is about the behavior of the ring (non-linear which is standard versus linear). In non-linear mode the focus point shifts faster the faster you move the ring. However it is very uncontrolled in terms where it exactly stops, so it's useless for focus pulls. In linear mode the ring behaves regardless of how fast you turn it, but it is different per lens how much turn (in degrees) it requires to move from one point to another. On top of that it is very imprecise. So, also pretty useless. Exception are the lenses with a clutch mechanism and a focus ring with hard stops (the 14mm, the 16/f1.4 and the old 23/f1.4). They allow for better MF control. Settings such as Sony, Nikon, Leica and Panasonic have where you can fine-tune the behavior of the focus ring are unfortunately not available in Fujifilm cameras.
  9. Or otherwise (depending on which Fuji camera you have) the 'Preview exposure/white-balance' in the same screen setting menu.
  10. Try the ThinkTank Retrospective bags. The MkII has some nice improvements and the style suits the traditional GFX50R (imo).
  11. This is most likely one of the known issues with the X-Pro2. I've had this on one of my two X-Pro2 copies and I've also heard this from others. The issue is the on/off switch. Though Fuji claims the camera is weather resistant, the sealing of the shutter button and it's collar isn't great and moisture can affect the contacts of the on/off button. Another similar weak point is the WR sealing of the back rear dial that can affect the push function of that rear dial. If it gets worse, you can have it serviced.
  12. Definitely contact your dealer. If this was sold to you as a new lens, it shouldn't have these blemishes. Having said that, I've had multiple quality assurance issues with Fuji lenses and cameras, so I wouldn't be surprised if this slipped their QA.
  13. I personally prefer the square hoods made by Squarehood as they have a very sleek profile. The round vented hoods (incl. the one from Fuji) get more 'in the way' of the optical viewfinder. The only downside of the Squarehood hoods is the lens cap. It comes with a flexible plastic one that is harder to attach and easier to loose than the standard hard plastic pinch lens caps. The upside from this flexible lens cap however, is that it's easy to carry in the pockets of your slimfit jeans. Whenever looking for a lens hood, be aware that with some (like the Haoge) you can't use filters (or at least not the thicker ones).
  14. It's not really a sensor cleaning that is performed. What the camera does when this option is switched on, every time you switch on/off your camera there's an ultra sonic vibration that 'shakes' dust particles off the sensor. It's an ultrasonic sound pulse so to speak. The dust particles are not removed from or collected inside the camera, so essentially they can return. This option is not an alternative for incidental sensor cleaning using a swab and some cleaning gel (to be performed by an experienced service employee). Best is to avoid dust inside the camera: don't leave the mount exposed for more time than necessary to switch lenses. Don't touch the sensor and don't use a blower to remove dust from inside the camera (you just blow in more dust).
  15. On the X100V the combination of filter and lens cap provide three functions: to make the camera weather (not water!) resistant (WR), to protect the front lens and to reduce the chance of flare and ghosting. Whether you want to make the camera WR, is entirely up to your shooting conditions. Remember, many tens of thousands of X100's in various versions have survived without being WR at all, so with a bit of care, you can also do without. Protecting the front element of the lens is a similar personal choice. Know that most damages to front elements occur while dropping the camera. A lens hood will only protect against that to a certain level. Another source of damage (scratches) is while the camera is in the bag or in a pocket. In that case lens cap will protect equally well, if not better. Finally, the lens of an X100V is not very prone to flare and ghosting, but if you shoot in direct sunlight, a lens hood will certainly reduce the chances to that. If not directly visible, often the reduced contrast is a telltale. Note: if you do decide on mounting a filter, make sure it's a good one with multicoating (B+W, Hoya, Fuji...). Cheap filters can ruin your images almost unnoticed.
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