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Herco

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  1. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Schuster in Recommendation on lenses for GFX100S   
    XF lenses do not work on GFX cameras. Their image circle isn't large enough to cover the sensor. An APS-C lens covers about 25% of a GFX sensor. Some full frame lenses work with a GFX but only restricted to a smaller part of the image (about 70% of the GFX sensor).
    I've worked with the GFX50S and shortly with the GFX100 for fashion and portraits. The combination of the 32-64 and the 110 works very well. Alternative is the 45-100. For landscape I can recommend the 23. Combine that with the 45-100 and you have a nice kit covering most.
    You also mention longer glass (XF50-140). Note that for GFX there's essentially one longer prime lens: the GF250, which is a bit shorter than 140mm in APS-C equiv.) and one zoom: the 100-200 (a bit over 100mm in APS-C). Both are massive and quite a burden to carry around. Fuji claims that the GFX100S is only slightly larger than a full frame mirrorless, but that's only half the story. When you take the lenses into account it is considerably larger and heavier to carry around compared to full frame.
    Although the GFX platform by design is well-suited for landscape, there's only one native real landscape lens (23). I guess there's room for a wider lens there. There are some third party options but at a lower quality standard (and price level).
  2. Like
    Herco got a reaction from plaidshirts in No shame in Nikon’s game, Fuji full frame denial   
    I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market.
    (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'.
    (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony.
    By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-).
    So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
  3. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from YOUTA in Do I need circular polarizer for mirrorless camera?   
    You should indeed use circular polarizing filters (and not linear). Also on a mirrorless digital camera. The quality of a CPL is crucial. 'Cheap' CPLs can ruin your lens performance. Pick one from a reputable brand. It might cost a bit more, but it's visibly worth it in terms of less color shifts, better sharpness and contrast.
  4. Like
    Herco got a reaction from George_P in Is the XT4 really worth it ?   
    There are a few major differences between the T3 and the T4 and only you can decide how important these are for you.
    The T4 has in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a bigger battery, a slightly more pronounced grip and an articulating screen over the T3. In terms of image quality, EVF and AF there's no difference between the cameras (after firmware update 4.xx).
    As you state that you will create video content the IBIS and the battery life can be real benefit. Whether the articulating screen of the T4 is a must-have for you, depends on whether you record yourself or not. For normal photographic use I'd prefer the 2-axis tilting screen of the T3, but this is very personal.
    The IBIS of the T4 is a significant advantage when you shoot video or low-light photography. Not to be underestimated unless you're a tripod-user. The battery of the T4 lasts about twice as long as the smaller T3 battery. Think about 45-60 min in video record mode in the T3 and 90-110 min for the T4. Additional spare batteries for the T3 are cheaper to buy though and a battery grip with two spare batteries mitigates the difference.
    Personally, if I were to do significant video work, I'd always opt for the T4 and buy if needed a pre-owned 35/f2. You could even consider the cheaper XC35/f2 rather than the XF35/f2. There's no difference in image quality, just in construction and aperture ring. Note that for video work the 35/f2 has quite heavy focus breathing. When that is a concern, you might want to opt for the 23/f2. 
    For photography only, I'd prefer the T3 for it's 2-axis tilting screen. When the T3 deal includes the 35/f2, I'd consider it a very good deal. This lens is usually $350 new and $250 pre-owned (depending on the market).
  5. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SETHSIDE in Is the XT4 really worth it ?   
    There are a few major differences between the T3 and the T4 and only you can decide how important these are for you.
    The T4 has in-body image stabilization (IBIS), a bigger battery, a slightly more pronounced grip and an articulating screen over the T3. In terms of image quality, EVF and AF there's no difference between the cameras (after firmware update 4.xx).
    As you state that you will create video content the IBIS and the battery life can be real benefit. Whether the articulating screen of the T4 is a must-have for you, depends on whether you record yourself or not. For normal photographic use I'd prefer the 2-axis tilting screen of the T3, but this is very personal.
    The IBIS of the T4 is a significant advantage when you shoot video or low-light photography. Not to be underestimated unless you're a tripod-user. The battery of the T4 lasts about twice as long as the smaller T3 battery. Think about 45-60 min in video record mode in the T3 and 90-110 min for the T4. Additional spare batteries for the T3 are cheaper to buy though and a battery grip with two spare batteries mitigates the difference.
    Personally, if I were to do significant video work, I'd always opt for the T4 and buy if needed a pre-owned 35/f2. You could even consider the cheaper XC35/f2 rather than the XF35/f2. There's no difference in image quality, just in construction and aperture ring. Note that for video work the 35/f2 has quite heavy focus breathing. When that is a concern, you might want to opt for the 23/f2. 
    For photography only, I'd prefer the T3 for it's 2-axis tilting screen. When the T3 deal includes the 35/f2, I'd consider it a very good deal. This lens is usually $350 new and $250 pre-owned (depending on the market).
  6. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Matt B in X100V - Recall for early models bc of heat issue?   
    I have had an early X100V too, but to my knowledge there is no recall action for the overheating issue. At least not in Europe. There's 'just' the firmware update that shifts the temperature point before switching-off occurs. I wouldn't know whether there is actually a repair possible without structural alterations to the camera. The hardware is hard to change I would assume. 
  7. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from Garajszki Máté in Can I increase manual focusing speed?   
    Unfortunately there is not. On the X-T4 there are two options re. the focus ring.
    One is about the direction of rotation (CW versus CCW).
    The other is about the behavior of the ring (non-linear which is standard versus linear). In non-linear mode the focus point shifts faster the faster you move the ring. However it is very uncontrolled in terms where it exactly stops, so it's useless for focus pulls. In linear mode the ring behaves regardless of how fast you turn it, but it is different per lens how much turn (in degrees) it requires to move from one point to another. On top of that it is very imprecise. So, also pretty useless.
    Exception are the lenses with a clutch mechanism and a focus ring with hard stops (the 14mm, the 16/f1.4 and the old 23/f1.4). They allow for better MF control.
    Settings such as Sony, Nikon, Leica and Panasonic have where you can fine-tune the behavior of the focus ring are unfortunately not available in Fujifilm cameras.
  8. Like
    Herco reacted to chakko in GF 32-64mm F4: Should I be worried about this defect?   
    Update - the vendor contacted Fujifilm and organised to swap the lens over within a couple days, so I'm very happy with it.
    I should point out, there's still some "marks" on the finish of the inner metal rings. They're like swirls in un-mixed paint. That's the best way I can describe it. There's nothing wrong with the lens, but it's a little surprising. Anyway, I'm quite happy!
    Back to exploring this camera system
  9. Like
    Herco reacted to jlmphotos in Bag for 50R   
    Yes. Thinktank Retrospective bags are fantastic bags - a bit heavy, but offer great protection and carrying capacity.  I have the Retrospective 5 and 10 in the pipestone (?) I think and I can load into the 5 the 50r, 30mm and 45mm.  If I want to take the 100-200 then I'll use the Retrospective 10.  But I'm a bag whore.  I must have 12-14 different bags and my wife has made me sell at least 10+ over the past couple of years.  There is NEVER the perfect bag.  Depending on where I'm going, how much walking I plan on doing, and whether I'm flying or driving I select my bag.  This past summer I spent eight weeks on the road shooting.  I packed a Manfrotto camera backpack which I kept in the car with my GFX gear, and my XH-1 and a few lenses for wildlife, then I threw in the van two other bags.  My Retro 10,, and a small Lowepro shoulder bag.  Depending on that days itinerary I would select the gear, then the bag.  My wife says I'm worse than her but this system works for me.  When I fly - I have photographed various resorts in the Carribean, Puerto Rico, and Costa Rica among a few other places, I pack a large backpack with my gear and since I usually stay at the resort/hotel, I can break it down there and distribute it among two/three other bags.  But I do not believe there is the perfect bag.  Also:  Another great place to buy some cool bags (which I have) is your local Salvation Army store!! Yes, weird, but some cool bags there.  Then you order some camera inserts from Amazon and basically you can design your own.  I have a few of those I'll use every now and then.  also check out Army Surplus stores in your neighborhood. Good finds there - as I avoid the super expensive "pretty" bags as I don't like to draw attention.
    Hope I didn't bore you too much.  
  10. Like
    Herco got a reaction from chakko in GF 32-64mm F4: Should I be worried about this defect?   
    Definitely contact your dealer. If this was sold to you as a new lens, it shouldn't have these blemishes. Having said that, I've had multiple quality assurance issues with Fuji lenses and cameras, so I wouldn't be surprised if this slipped their QA.
  11. Like
    Herco got a reaction from jlmphotos in Bag for 50R   
    Try the ThinkTank Retrospective bags. The MkII has some nice improvements and the style suits the traditional GFX50R (imo).
  12. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Golden Oxen in First generation Fuji X lenses on 40MP sensor body?   
    In the past Fujifilm rep's have stated that XF lenses were designed for up to 32MP which at that time (the 24MP was just introduced) seemed like an abundant margin. It's not that all newer lenses are able to resolve higher resolutions. The 16-80 for instance is a fine lens when you look at the center, but only average in corners and near the edge. Esp. at longer focal lengths. Primes like the 35/2 and the 80/2.8 are probably better equipped to resolve a 40MP sensor. However, it's clear that Fujifilm has a lot of MkII lenses to go...
    However, whether a lens is able to resolve the megapixels of the sensor doesn't tell the whole story. Many Fujifilm fans rave about the 35/1.4 where, in all honesty, the character of the lens is partly because of some optical flaws. In fact, some Leica shooters are paying top dollar for vintage lenses that aren't very sharp at all. It's the particular look they're after. So, if you love a lens, don't worry whether it can resolve all 40MPs. You'll hardly notice the difference between 32 and 40MP anyway.
  13. Like
    Herco reacted to jlmphotos in First generation Fuji X lenses on 40MP sensor body?   
    Well I don't think Fuji will be re-designing lenses for a higher MP sensor.  At least I don't think so.  I do remember the days when I used my Nikon bevy of lenses on my D300, D700 and D3 which were 12mp cameras and then upgraded to the 36mp D800E beast.  Honestly, other than having to manually fine-tune each lens to the D800 I did not see any degradation in image quality.  But, these were all Nikon lenses; I'm not sure how third party lenses would have fared back then as I didn't own any.  Personaly, if I were to by the XH-2, I would have no qualms whatsoever using ANY of my Fuji lenses with the upgraded 40MP Body.
     
  14. Like
    Herco got a reaction from CatsAreGods in Focus ring on 16-80 lens when Camera is in Auto   
    No, there's no risk of damage. Actually there's a setting in the AF Menu that allows you to work with manual focus overriding the autofocus of the camera (AF+MF). So you can let the camera do its AF and then manually fine-tune with the focus ring if needed.
  15. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from Cyn2020 in No shame in Nikon’s game, Fuji full frame denial   
    I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market.
    (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'.
    (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony.
    By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-).
    So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
  16. Like
    Herco got a reaction from operanut1972 in No shame in Nikon’s game, Fuji full frame denial   
    I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market.
    (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'.
    (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony.
    By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-).
    So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
  17. Like
    Herco got a reaction from dgeorge959 in Looking to jump into the Fuji system   
    The 10-24 is a great landscape lens. Often zoom lenses have a strong and a weak end and with the 10-24 the strong end is definitely towards the 10mm end, which is usually great for landscape.
    The 8-16 is an expensive alternative. I would only recommend it if you really need the f2.8 and the 8mm end. It requires special filterholders as well, which makes it even more expensive. It is good, though you need to stop down to f5.6 for best performance. Wide open it suffers a bit from vignetting and distortion, which is well corrected afterwards but correction always affects image quality in corners and edges. It’s also a bulky lens due to its nature.
    As for primes the most obvious choices are the 14/2.8 and the 16/1.4. The 16/1.4 is one of Fuji’s best XF lenses, but the 14 isn’t far behind. Both have the focus clutch that allows you to manually focus with hard stops. Great for landscape.
    A lesser known alternative is the Zeiss Touit 12/2.8 for X-mount. This is a fantastic lens. It has the great Zeiss color rendering and contrast. You only need to be a bit aware of potential flare and ghosting. So be careful whenever the sun is in the frame.
    I have no experience with the Samyang/Rokinon lenses for Fuji. There seems to be a great 10mm prime… It’s only manual focus though…
  18. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from dward in Looking to jump into the Fuji system   
    Welcome @dgeorge959. Both are excellent cameras and depending on the lens you're using, they should be very suitable for landscapes too. Image quality is the same. I've had both and I've also used them professionally for a while. Just a short list of the most significant differences that I can recall.
    - There's obviously quite a difference in the form factor of the camera. The H1 has a deep grip and is a bit less 'retro-styled'. For long handheld shoots I prefer the H1, but you can also mount a grip to the T2 to reach more or less similar. However, mounting a grip on the T2 doesn't change the position of the shutter release button and that is again a way better experience with the H1 for long handheld shooting. Of course this is all moot, when you use a tripod;
    - The H1 is a bit more robust built and has slightly better weather-sealing. It is more aimed at 'pro-use'. The outer coating is more resistant to scratches and markings. The mount is more robust to better handle large lenses like the 200mm and the 100-400 zoom. The result is that the H1 is a bit bigger and heavier, but compared to your 5D still small;
    - The H1 has an annoying bug in some series: occasionally you get read/write errors when writing to the SD Cards. The only way out is to switch off and on the camera. Always use the Fuji recommended SD cards, insert/eject with care (camera switched off) and format the cards in the camera (every time after transferring the files). But even then... I've had 3 H1's over 3 years time and 2 of them had the recurring issue. Fuji wasn't able to fix it. I never heard of T2's with the similar recurring issue, but the T3 has it as well. Many Fuji-users have never experienced it, but it's an annoying issue for a small group; 
    - Obviously the H1 has IBIS (in-body image stabilization) but that is less relevant for landscape shooting. However, even when you turn it off, the H1 uses noticeable more battery power than the T2. So, while they use the same battery, you really want at least 1 or 2 spare batteries with the H1;
    - The H1 has the top sub-LCD which I always found very handy. However, this comes at the expense of the exposure compensation dial on the T2 top plate. The H1 has a button combined with the front- or rear dial for Exp. Comp. It's a matter of preference and getting used to;
    - The H1 has a touch screen as LCD. Fortunately you can switch it off entirely, because it's not a very good one (slow, lagging and sometimes non-responsive). It takes up battery life as well. In landscape photography it can be a nice feature to select focus points (when on tripod) and release the shutter, but most users I know, switch it off anyway;
    - The H1 has Bluetooth connectivity to the Fuji app (the T2 only Wifi). Bluetooth works way better, but the Fuji app is still 'crap' so you might not need it. A real significant difference though is the EVF. The H1 has a visibly much better EVF with higher resolution but also, more importantly. a higher refresh rate resulting in smoother movements and less noise in low-light situations;
    - The AF is more or less the same, but the H1 was designed for high speed action/sports. In my experience the AF of the H1 reacts a bit quicker when a subject is moving (less threshold) but the result is that specifically with eye-AF the H1 can sometimes erratically switch between eyes with only the slightest movement. The T2 is a bit more 'relaxed' and as a result sometimes works better in AF-C mode. However, with landscape this might not interest you at all;
    - More important is that the H1 allows you to change the behavior of the manual focus ring on the lens. Not only the direction, but also the response (linear vs. non-linear). When you work with MF (like many do in landscape photography) linear MF allows you to control the ring way better. The focus shift isn't depending anymore on the speed with which you move the ring (like it is with non-linear). The T2 only supports non-linear. Some of the Fujinon lenses have a focus clutch with hard stops on the lens (the 14/2.8, the 16/1.4 and the old 23/1.4. For those lenses it doesn't make a difference. 
    - Both cameras a popular on the second-hand market, but the H1 a bit more. So, expect to pay a premium for an H1 in very good condition. The difference is easily $200-300 between comparable T2's and H1's.
    I hope this has helped you a bit to make a choice 
  19. Like
    Herco got a reaction from dgeorge959 in Looking to jump into the Fuji system   
    Welcome @dgeorge959. Both are excellent cameras and depending on the lens you're using, they should be very suitable for landscapes too. Image quality is the same. I've had both and I've also used them professionally for a while. Just a short list of the most significant differences that I can recall.
    - There's obviously quite a difference in the form factor of the camera. The H1 has a deep grip and is a bit less 'retro-styled'. For long handheld shoots I prefer the H1, but you can also mount a grip to the T2 to reach more or less similar. However, mounting a grip on the T2 doesn't change the position of the shutter release button and that is again a way better experience with the H1 for long handheld shooting. Of course this is all moot, when you use a tripod;
    - The H1 is a bit more robust built and has slightly better weather-sealing. It is more aimed at 'pro-use'. The outer coating is more resistant to scratches and markings. The mount is more robust to better handle large lenses like the 200mm and the 100-400 zoom. The result is that the H1 is a bit bigger and heavier, but compared to your 5D still small;
    - The H1 has an annoying bug in some series: occasionally you get read/write errors when writing to the SD Cards. The only way out is to switch off and on the camera. Always use the Fuji recommended SD cards, insert/eject with care (camera switched off) and format the cards in the camera (every time after transferring the files). But even then... I've had 3 H1's over 3 years time and 2 of them had the recurring issue. Fuji wasn't able to fix it. I never heard of T2's with the similar recurring issue, but the T3 has it as well. Many Fuji-users have never experienced it, but it's an annoying issue for a small group; 
    - Obviously the H1 has IBIS (in-body image stabilization) but that is less relevant for landscape shooting. However, even when you turn it off, the H1 uses noticeable more battery power than the T2. So, while they use the same battery, you really want at least 1 or 2 spare batteries with the H1;
    - The H1 has the top sub-LCD which I always found very handy. However, this comes at the expense of the exposure compensation dial on the T2 top plate. The H1 has a button combined with the front- or rear dial for Exp. Comp. It's a matter of preference and getting used to;
    - The H1 has a touch screen as LCD. Fortunately you can switch it off entirely, because it's not a very good one (slow, lagging and sometimes non-responsive). It takes up battery life as well. In landscape photography it can be a nice feature to select focus points (when on tripod) and release the shutter, but most users I know, switch it off anyway;
    - The H1 has Bluetooth connectivity to the Fuji app (the T2 only Wifi). Bluetooth works way better, but the Fuji app is still 'crap' so you might not need it. A real significant difference though is the EVF. The H1 has a visibly much better EVF with higher resolution but also, more importantly. a higher refresh rate resulting in smoother movements and less noise in low-light situations;
    - The AF is more or less the same, but the H1 was designed for high speed action/sports. In my experience the AF of the H1 reacts a bit quicker when a subject is moving (less threshold) but the result is that specifically with eye-AF the H1 can sometimes erratically switch between eyes with only the slightest movement. The T2 is a bit more 'relaxed' and as a result sometimes works better in AF-C mode. However, with landscape this might not interest you at all;
    - More important is that the H1 allows you to change the behavior of the manual focus ring on the lens. Not only the direction, but also the response (linear vs. non-linear). When you work with MF (like many do in landscape photography) linear MF allows you to control the ring way better. The focus shift isn't depending anymore on the speed with which you move the ring (like it is with non-linear). The T2 only supports non-linear. Some of the Fujinon lenses have a focus clutch with hard stops on the lens (the 14/2.8, the 16/1.4 and the old 23/1.4. For those lenses it doesn't make a difference. 
    - Both cameras a popular on the second-hand market, but the H1 a bit more. So, expect to pay a premium for an H1 in very good condition. The difference is easily $200-300 between comparable T2's and H1's.
    I hope this has helped you a bit to make a choice 
  20. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from Danstall in XT4 Film great, stills washed out and blurred   
    Great. I'm sure you don't plan to read the manual, but on YouTube there are some video tutorials to cover the basis settings.
    Just type in "setup fujifilm xt4" in the search box.
     
  21. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from Danstall in XT4 Film great, stills washed out and blurred   
    Couple of most likely settings.
    Re. sharpness/blurriness: set the AF mode to AF-S (front of camera) and in the AF menu the AF mode to single point. Now take a photo with one object in the center covered by the green focus box. That object should be tack sharp in the photo unless your shutter speed is really low (below 1/30th). In the IQ menu set the image size to L 3:2 and the image quality to F or F+RAW.
    Re. washed-out colors: press the Q button - set the film simulation to STD (Provia) and make sure that color is set to 0. S-Tone and H-Tone should be no more than -1 or +1 and switch Grain off. Make sure that you set White Balance to Auto, the aperture and shutter speed ring to A and switch on Auto ISO.
    With these settings you should at least get 'normal' images. You have to check these on your computer. The LCD on the camera is not very accurate. If you did check the images on the LCD make sure that in the Set Up menu under Screen Set Up, the LCD brightness and color are set to 0.
  22. Like
    Herco got a reaction from mrPeter in XT2, strange problem, black frames.   
    This is most likely 'the card write' issue that is quite common to Fujifilm cameras. For some strange reason Fuji is quite susceptible to card write issues. Try different configurations (back-up - sequential - raw/jpeg) for the card slot settings in case your camera has two slots. Also only use Fuji recommended SD cards and always format them in camera before use and never pull out the cards (and back in) with the camera powered on.
    However, above recommendations are no guarantee. On top of several other issues, this for me was the reason to no longer use Fuji cameras for my professional work. In 36 years I haven't lost a roll of film or a single image on card, but in my 6 years with the Fuji X-system it happened to me about a dozen times. Esp. the X-H1 (otherwise their best X so far) was notorious, according the specialist at my camera (repair) store.
    If you have a Fujifilm camera that behaves like this and still have warranty on it, have it checked and possibly repaired. I've heard of cases that were solved after a service. Not in my experience, but perhaps you're luckier...
  23. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Bolton in No shame in Nikon’s game, Fuji full frame denial   
    I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market.
    (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'.
    (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony.
    By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-).
    So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
  24. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Aleksandr_m.f in No shame in Nikon’s game, Fuji full frame denial   
    I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market.
    (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'.
    (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony.
    By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-).
    So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
  25. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Aleksandr_m.f in Х system become very expensive   
    The 50mm/f1.0 is even $1,500… 
    First, I advise you to move this thread to General Discussion in the news forum. It is less about photos and more generic Fuji.
    I fully agree that the newer Fuji cameras and lenses become increasingly expensive. That is a general trend in the market. A Sony A1 of $6,500 was unthinkable 5 years ago… Next to all sorts of resource issues (chip shortage, transport issues, rare earth metals…) we see price increases, due to declining markets. The camera market (compact + interchangeable lens) declined by 90% between 2010 and 2020. So R&D and manufacturing costs need to be spread over a smaller number of cameras and lenses.
    However, we also see full-frame cameras going down-market. Priced right into aps-c territory. The costs of the image sensor make up less of the overall costs compared to 5y ago. Only the very new, high-res BSI sensors remain pricey, but the basic 24mp full-frame sensor is more or less the same priced compared to a 24/26mp aps-c sensor.
    You can argue whether a Sony A7C or a Nikon Z5 is as good overall as an X-T4, but if you value the benefits of full-frame, now is the time to move. For me, the Fujifilm sweetspot is the compact lines (X-S10, X-T30, X-E4…) and the smaller lenses (f2 primes and budget zooms). The fast primes, red badge zooms, X-T4 and later on X-H2 are indeed in full-frame territory and esp. interesting for those who are very Fuji-minded.
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