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Herco

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  1. Like
    Herco got a reaction from ottokar in Strange sound GFX 50r   
    Depends a bit...is the lens attached to the camera and does the sound come from the lens? If so, it could indeed be the OIS from the lens -provided it is a stabilised lens- or you've set Pre-AF to ON in the AF menu. In that case it's the AF motor you hear. You might want to switch off Pre-AF since it drains the camera battery.
  2. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from CatsAreGods in Fujifilm USA Repair Center and X-S10 issues   
    This is one of the more common error messages with Fujifilm cameras. It happens across the range, so buying an X-T4 doesn't rule out the error. In most of the cases it comes down to two issues: (a) card read/write issues - also when switching on, the camera tries to read the cards or (b) unable to detect the lens (sometimes combined with f0 message on screen). 
    Possible remedies: use only Fuji recommended cards. Fuji cameras are extremely susceptible to cards. I never lost images due to card issues until I started to work with Fuji. It happened a couple of times already. As for the lens, try to demount/mount the lens again.
    As for the repair service: did Fuji USA repair the camera or Adorama themselves (or their partner)? I use Fujifilm Professional Service (FPS) here in Europe and have noticed that their quality differs greatly per country. I've been told that FPS USA is rather good and almost on the same level as those PS-ses from Canon, Nikon and Sony. I assume your camera is still under warranty and Adorama should solve the issue regardless of which repair service they use. Seek publicity also on Adoramas user review board.
  3. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Klaus Armitter in What do you use to manage photos?   
    For limited numbers of images (up to 100k or so), the Lightroom or Capture One Catalogue usually will do. If you work in projects -like I usually do- Capture One Sessions is a much better option. I can also recommend the DAM (Digital Asset Management) of ON1 Photo Raw as it keeps raw and jpegs nicely together when you cull them. For large numbers of images Photo Mechanic is by far the best. It's often used by journalists and other pro's who have to search for certain images based on content.
    Either way, it's good to setup a file/directory structure on your PC/Mac that has some kind of system. E.g. per year/month/topic... before you load the images into a catalogue. And don't forget to backup...
  4. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SPB in Phase Detection AF and the FUJINON GF50mmF3.5 R LM WR   
    Depends on which GFX body you use the lens. Only the 100-versions have hybrid Contrast and Phase Detect AF. The 50-versions only have Contrast Detect AF.
  5. Like
    Herco got a reaction from RBKEEN in newbie requiring help   
    Hi and welcome to Fuji 😉
    I'm not so sure about the D750 being outdated and so... It is still a great camera used by lots of professionals as well. To be really honest even today's best mirrorless cameras re. auto-focus like Sony's A7RIV and A9II are still not as good in AF as the best DSLRs (among which I also count the D750 and D810).
    Fuji's AF has become quite good in the latest generations but there are a few caveats. First, your 16-80 lens is a recent design with fast AF performance. The 55-200 however, is a bit older and is fine at best re. AF. So, your best results will probably be with the 16-80. The f4 limitation of that lens however, will limit the low light AF performance of the X-T4 a bit.
    The X-T4 offers various tweaks to adjust AF to the circumstances. This is a bit cumbersome as it is not really good in auto detecting the required setting. You will have to do that for the camera. You can designate some options to function buttons on the camera for future quick access.
    Here's my recommendation:
    Set the AF mode to AF-C (front of camera). In the menu 'SHOOTING' and sub-menu 'AF/MF Settings' select mode 5 in the AF-C Custom Settings. This is for erratically moving subjects. This sets the tracking sensitivity to a locked-on mode, the tracking speed to the quickest and the zone area to auto (as the dogs move back and forth). It is a good starting point for further tweaking. Once you've find the best setting you can store that under custom AF-C mode (mode 6). Then make sure that the number of focus points is set at 425 for the widest coverage of focus points unless you follow the dogs with the camera and keep them center-frame. Switch Pre-AF on. This speeds up the focusing process when you half-press the shutter release button. Unfortunately the X-T4 doesn't recognize animal eyes, so face-AF and eye-AF doesn't help here. Best to switch that off and prevent the camera from scanning for faces/eyes. I've seen the X-T3/4 recognizing faces while they were not there (in shapes of leafs and so). You may also want to test release/focus priority. With focus priority usually you have the best hit rate for in-focus shots, however, it may also result to your camera when losing track of the subject instead refocus on a different subject. I'd recommend release priority in that case. You may have more shots out-of-focus, but at least more to choose from as well.
  6. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SPB in Leica Monochom envy   
    maxmax.com converts many Fujifilm cameras to monochrome. It's quite expensive, but probably not more than when Fujifilm would launch a monochrome themselves. Previously, Fujifilm managers stated that a monochrome is not to be expected any time.
    As a former Leica owner (those film days) every time I pick up a Leica I'm tempted again. The Q2 monochrome will probably not be an exception. It's not made for people looking for features or value-for-money (though it holds fantastic value in the second-hand market) and in that respect its hard to compare with other brands. It's just like cars: you don't need a BMW to be happy, but it sure helps 😉 (for those who like cars)
  7. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SBK in Anyone else disappointed w/ build quality?   
    I've been told by a Fuji rep. in London that the X-T4's build in Japan were part of the first series (start of production) that was predominantly shipped to the US to overcome trade taxes or kept in Japan (made here sentiment). Goal is to have all the X-T's and 'lower' manufactured in China and the 'flagship' cameras (GFX, X-Pro's and the next X-H) in Japan. There shouldn't be a difference in build quality.
  8. Like
    Herco got a reaction from mcewena in What do you use to manage photos?   
    For limited numbers of images (up to 100k or so), the Lightroom or Capture One Catalogue usually will do. If you work in projects -like I usually do- Capture One Sessions is a much better option. I can also recommend the DAM (Digital Asset Management) of ON1 Photo Raw as it keeps raw and jpegs nicely together when you cull them. For large numbers of images Photo Mechanic is by far the best. It's often used by journalists and other pro's who have to search for certain images based on content.
    Either way, it's good to setup a file/directory structure on your PC/Mac that has some kind of system. E.g. per year/month/topic... before you load the images into a catalogue. And don't forget to backup...
  9. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Jim White in When the display of viewfinder is dark, how can i focus manually?   
    You probably need to switch off Preview Exposure in the Setup/screen setup menu.
  10. Thanks
    Herco reacted to SBK in New to Fuji cameras.   
    Welcome !
    Newbie myself to the Fujifilm's world.
    The GFX 100S is a lot of weight to carry around, unless the kind of pictures you want to take requires very high resolution.
    I am transiting from the full-frame world to APS-C to downsize the weight 🙂
  11. Like
    Herco got a reaction from CatsAreGods in When the display of viewfinder is dark, how can i focus manually?   
    You probably need to switch off Preview Exposure in the Setup/screen setup menu.
  12. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SPB in Recommendation for GFX100S?   
    These are two very different cameras and if you’re equally value stills and video I wouldn’t recommend a GFX100(S) for that. We’ve had the GFX100 here for a couple of months and though it is great for stills, it is a bit cumbersome for video. The AF works fine in single mode, but in continuous mode when shooting video, it can hunt quite a bit depending the lens and it often looses focus with moving subjects. Next to that the processor in the GFX100(S) is still the same as in the X-T3 and 4 and with the pixel downsampling (from 100MP sensor to about 10MP for 4K) it struggles in processing power. Don’t get me wrong, the GFX can do video, but its certainly not designed for that like the A1.
  13. Like
    Herco got a reaction from K PRETHVIRAJ in XT3- LCD preview image colours different to final image   
    Adding to the good advice from Olaf: you’re not mentioning whether you look at raw or jpeg images on your computer. If its jpeg you may want to check which film simulation is active. Some film simulations have subdued colors and whites can be a bit greyish or blue-ish depending on the WB set. Most neutral ones are Provia and Pro Neg Std. The selected film simulation will also impact the preview jpeg in the raw file. Finally, did you calibrate you laptop monitor?
  14. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from K PRETHVIRAJ in Post-Processing Backlog   
    I think this is very recognizable for a lot of enthusiasts. What I notice in workshops and talking to photographers is that they view every image as important and spend roughly the same amount of time on every image. Let me give some of my thoughts on this. For my professional work I have a different workflow compared to my personal work. 
    Professionally I shoot mostly tethered in the studio. With Hasselblad to Phocus software or with Nikon Z to Capture One (C1) in Sessions. C1 is setup to automatically apply the Style and some other editing tasks like Curve, Camera, Lens and sharpening/noise reduction. During the shoot we'll mark the images as 'keep/delete/don't know'. After the shoot the Art Director will make a final selection. Sometimes out of a 1000 images we only keep 4 or 5 for further processing. The editor or designer will work on those images remote. First the basics in C1, then the details in Photoshop. Each end shot easily takes 30-60 min of work.
    For my personal work I do all the culling, editing and exporting myself. The import/culling process is the most important. Here you define how much work you'll end up with. I notice that amateurs rarely are selective enough. They tend to keep most of the images even though they have multiple shots of the same scene. You don't have to throw them away, just don't import everything. Be very selective. I often import only 5% of the images. Sometimes because they're technically not good enough, but mostly because they're lacking artistic quality. Of course you shoot for your own enjoyment, but while culling your images think: "what would a viewer think of this? Is it worth looking at?". If not, don't import.
    At importing I use the Camera Profile, Lens Correction, Curve and Style that I want, so I don't need to revisit that. Then I'll revisit the images one-by-one and decide which ones I want to further work on. That is again a subset of what is imported. I only work on the images that will be exported for print or publish in my portfolio. The rest will stay there un-edited. When editing start with keystone corrections, cropping and white balance (WB can often be done in batch mode). Then I move to overall exposure, contrast and color and then the work that needs to be done in layers (like dodge and burn, color editing, vignettes and cleaning). Finally I have export recipes in C1 that almost automatically create the files for print or publishing. I rarely do a lot of sharpening and noise reduction. That is taken care of by the defaults in C1. Only the occasional NR for high-ISO images. Most of the work takes me about 30 sec per image unless I go into 'layer-work'. That may take 5-10 mins per image. It saves you a lot of time when you know what you want to do with an image and have a workflow. Moving the sliders back-and-forth takes a lot of time and isn't very useful unless you have a goal in mind. So, take some time to look at an image without adjusting. After editing, step away and if needed revisit a few days later. Just staring and trying usually doesn't make it better. 
    There are excellent resources online to help you develop your own workflow. Scott Detweiler, Scott Davenport, Thomas Fitzgerald, Hudson Henry and Anthony Morganti to name a few. And of course the YT channel of your favorite raw editor.
  15. Thanks
    Herco reacted to jerryy in Film Simulations are Worthless   
    For some Fujifilm cameras, the color space affects the view seen through the evf differently than the lcd back-screen (old problem). Using the wider Adobe color space instead of the sRGB color space gave similar results to both, so the evf was being fed a different data stream; which stream fed the displayed histogram (lcd vs evf) was not clear. Hence use the wider one. Of course Adobe RGB is not good for jpegs except when the monitor correctly shows the colorspace, but Adobe RGB is better for raw. Even better is ProPhoto RGB and ever better is XYZ.
  16. Like
    Herco got a reaction from dward in Post-Processing Backlog   
    I think this is very recognizable for a lot of enthusiasts. What I notice in workshops and talking to photographers is that they view every image as important and spend roughly the same amount of time on every image. Let me give some of my thoughts on this. For my professional work I have a different workflow compared to my personal work. 
    Professionally I shoot mostly tethered in the studio. With Hasselblad to Phocus software or with Nikon Z to Capture One (C1) in Sessions. C1 is setup to automatically apply the Style and some other editing tasks like Curve, Camera, Lens and sharpening/noise reduction. During the shoot we'll mark the images as 'keep/delete/don't know'. After the shoot the Art Director will make a final selection. Sometimes out of a 1000 images we only keep 4 or 5 for further processing. The editor or designer will work on those images remote. First the basics in C1, then the details in Photoshop. Each end shot easily takes 30-60 min of work.
    For my personal work I do all the culling, editing and exporting myself. The import/culling process is the most important. Here you define how much work you'll end up with. I notice that amateurs rarely are selective enough. They tend to keep most of the images even though they have multiple shots of the same scene. You don't have to throw them away, just don't import everything. Be very selective. I often import only 5% of the images. Sometimes because they're technically not good enough, but mostly because they're lacking artistic quality. Of course you shoot for your own enjoyment, but while culling your images think: "what would a viewer think of this? Is it worth looking at?". If not, don't import.
    At importing I use the Camera Profile, Lens Correction, Curve and Style that I want, so I don't need to revisit that. Then I'll revisit the images one-by-one and decide which ones I want to further work on. That is again a subset of what is imported. I only work on the images that will be exported for print or publish in my portfolio. The rest will stay there un-edited. When editing start with keystone corrections, cropping and white balance (WB can often be done in batch mode). Then I move to overall exposure, contrast and color and then the work that needs to be done in layers (like dodge and burn, color editing, vignettes and cleaning). Finally I have export recipes in C1 that almost automatically create the files for print or publishing. I rarely do a lot of sharpening and noise reduction. That is taken care of by the defaults in C1. Only the occasional NR for high-ISO images. Most of the work takes me about 30 sec per image unless I go into 'layer-work'. That may take 5-10 mins per image. It saves you a lot of time when you know what you want to do with an image and have a workflow. Moving the sliders back-and-forth takes a lot of time and isn't very useful unless you have a goal in mind. So, take some time to look at an image without adjusting. After editing, step away and if needed revisit a few days later. Just staring and trying usually doesn't make it better. 
    There are excellent resources online to help you develop your own workflow. Scott Detweiler, Scott Davenport, Thomas Fitzgerald, Hudson Henry and Anthony Morganti to name a few. And of course the YT channel of your favorite raw editor.
  17. Like
    Herco reacted to dward in Film Simulations are Worthless   
    Agreed, I was hoping the “unless you like Canon’s JPEG” caveat would address the individual preferences.
  18. Like
    Herco got a reaction from Olaf W. in Film Simulations are Worthless   
    Hi Olaf, you're right about the processing and taste of simulations. Nevertheless, it would be good if Fuji would include a setting that bypasses all Highlight/Shadow, Color, Film Simulations etc. for the sake of unaffected Histogram readings. As it is now implemented, even in case you shoot raw-only, the histogram displays the effects of the active Custom Settings. You have to consciously create a flat profile in Custom Settings and select that, in order to get the 'raw' histogram.
  19. Like
    Herco got a reaction from mrPeter in Film Simulations are Worthless   
    I see your point, but there's an easy way around this. First you have to know that all film simulations and settings like color, highlight/shadow tones, grain et cetera only affect the jpeg image and not the raw (RAF) file. However, within each raw file there's also a small jpeg included for preview purposes. Regardless of whether you shoot raw-only or raw+jpeg, that embedded jpeg will also be created based on your settings and selected film simulation. It is used for display purposes like the EVF/LCD but also in preview mode in Lightroom and Capture One.
    Now the tricky part: that preview jpeg is also used for your histogram. So the histogram actually doesn't show the 'real scene' but the jpeg interpretation of it. If you expose using that histogram it will also affect the raw. So there is an indirect impact of film simulation and H/S settings to the raw file. The setting of Natural Live View alone (or: Preview Pic. Effect) doesn't solve this. Fuji should have included a 'neutral' or bypass mode as well (like e.g. Nikon) but unfortunately they don't.
    However, there's a way around this. Create a 'flat' profile for when you are only interested in the raw file. You do that by selecting a film profile with less contrast and neutral colors like PRO NEG STD (or PROVIA/STD) and set the Highlight and Shadow tone to -2 and color to 0. Keep WB and DR on auto and switch on Natural Live View. Now we get a flat neutral image (real scene) with a live histogram that resembles the real values. Using that histogram we can expose exactly how we want the shadows and highlights to be. Further on in post you have the largest possible latitude in your raw file.
  20. Like
    Herco got a reaction from K PRETHVIRAJ in 3rd party lenses   
    Most likely because the X-S10 is too new to be listed. Most 3rd party lens manufacturers go over extensive testing before they claim compatibility. Give them some time. Either way, bear in mind that 3rd party lenses sometimes have unexpected issues. E.g. the Viltrox 23/1.4 mentioned by @jacobus had some issues with X-Pro3 bodies. It was scuffing the lens release button. Viltrox now issues a warning for that, but did not (yet) fix the problem.
  21. Like
    Herco got a reaction from K PRETHVIRAJ in Sharpness of Fuji lenses vs. Canon lenses   
    With Fuji raw files the raw converter matters but no so much for sharpness and contrast. Mostly for artefacts and noise reduction. Lightroom or Capture One shouldn’t be really different when it comes to sharpness. In all honesty you’re comparing a pro-grade full-frame camera like the 5DMkIII (had one for many years) with a consumer grade aps-c camera which most Fuji cameras are. On top of that you mention L-glass which is Canon’s most discerning line of lenses. Without exactly knowing which hardware you’re comparing, my guess is that your expectations are a bit too high. I use Fuji for personal work and have used it for a few years professionally as well (X-H1 a/o with red badge zooms and fast primes). I’m very happy with the results but they’re not in the same league as my current full frame Nikon Z’s. Let alone the Hasselblad H6D... 
  22. Like
    Herco got a reaction from K PRETHVIRAJ in Film Simulations are Worthless   
    I see your point, but there's an easy way around this. First you have to know that all film simulations and settings like color, highlight/shadow tones, grain et cetera only affect the jpeg image and not the raw (RAF) file. However, within each raw file there's also a small jpeg included for preview purposes. Regardless of whether you shoot raw-only or raw+jpeg, that embedded jpeg will also be created based on your settings and selected film simulation. It is used for display purposes like the EVF/LCD but also in preview mode in Lightroom and Capture One.
    Now the tricky part: that preview jpeg is also used for your histogram. So the histogram actually doesn't show the 'real scene' but the jpeg interpretation of it. If you expose using that histogram it will also affect the raw. So there is an indirect impact of film simulation and H/S settings to the raw file. The setting of Natural Live View alone (or: Preview Pic. Effect) doesn't solve this. Fuji should have included a 'neutral' or bypass mode as well (like e.g. Nikon) but unfortunately they don't.
    However, there's a way around this. Create a 'flat' profile for when you are only interested in the raw file. You do that by selecting a film profile with less contrast and neutral colors like PRO NEG STD (or PROVIA/STD) and set the Highlight and Shadow tone to -2 and color to 0. Keep WB and DR on auto and switch on Natural Live View. Now we get a flat neutral image (real scene) with a live histogram that resembles the real values. Using that histogram we can expose exactly how we want the shadows and highlights to be. Further on in post you have the largest possible latitude in your raw file.
  23. Thanks
    Herco got a reaction from SPB in I Bought a New Fuji GFX 50r ... need a little help   
    Provia is indeed the most standard film simulation of all. When you use that as a starting point and create a custom profile dialing down all highlight, shadow and color settings to -1 or -2 you get a very flat profile in jpegs. You can also set the screen to 'Natural Live View' in the Setup>Screen Setting menu (switch it to ON). That way it will not display film simulations on screen (just monochrome and sepia when selected).
    Note that when you select a film simulation (any) that information is also stored in the RAW file. Some RAW-convertors use that for display purposes when importing the RAW file. You can easily bypass that by selecting the required ICC profile and curve. In Capture One by default the RAW image will be displayed using the selected film simulation (camera specific ICC profile and curve on AUTO). When you want to see the pure RAW image in Capture One you should select LINEAR as a curve, You can default this in the import dialogue. 
  24. Like
    Herco got a reaction from SPB in Leica Monochom envy   
    I guess it depends heavily on where you are located. In all my 35+ years with Leica (I've always had one or two) I rarely had to fall back on their Customer Support. But when I did, I directly reverted to their Wetzlar office in Germany and they've always been great and swift.
    I hear similar stories from colleagues in the US re. Fujifilm Professional Service (FPS) over there, but here in Europe FPS is a bit of a joke. I have (of have had) various Fuji cameras and more than 10 lenses but the process of repair and service is tedious and costly. Even with an FPS subscription (although it is for free). And when you ask for a temp replacement, they never seem to have one... 
  25. Like
    Herco got a reaction from MarcelMartinez in Sony FE lenses on Fuji X camera?   
    Thanks Marcel, I didn't know such an adapter existed. I'm using Nikon Z in the studio here but some of my colleagues use Sony EF. I've been jealous of a few of the lenses (the Loxias and the GM135). I think I'll order one to see if it works and I'll let you know here.
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