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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/26/2021 in Posts

  1. That was the case! I was opening the photos with the basic Windows program and once I opened them in Rawttherapee the RAW looked so much better! Thank you so much. I was using the basic photo program that came with Windows and turns out that was a bad idea. I understand that the RAW photos are mainly used for further processing but I thought they should appear better to begin with and that's what happens when I open them with Rawtherapee. Thanks to your comment I found that program and can now make some adjustments to the RAW to make it look a bit better! Thanks a lot. I will indeed look into taking more pictures in JPEG and use RAW only for images that I feel like I will process later. For now I'm using Rawtherapee since I'm just starting out but thanks a lot for the info!
    2 points
  2. jerryy

    image sharpness

    Hello back at you! I am still ‘Alive and Kicking’. How are you doing these days? But always though, as you and Greybeard show, I cannot get lazy in looking at these images, I should look closer. But the image, as shot, looks okay to me. 😀
    2 points
  3. mdm

    image sharpness

    Hi Jerryy! How is it going! The lens in 16-80. I load jpg in Capture One and see that sharpness slider set to zero. It could be due the camera setup. When you switch the sharpness off images might looks realy soft. I adjusted it as it should be and it helps a bit Ruta, if you have RAF file as well post it here. C1 can show where the real focus point in the image is.
    2 points
  4. 2 points
  5. Hi Urbane, A photo shot at 6246px x 4170 pixels is the same whether or not it is saved with a 72dpi or 300dpi. You can change the dpi without resampling by unclicking the Resample check box and entering the desired dpi. This will have no effect on the file resolution - just the output. Example: For the Fuji 6246px x 4170px file at 72 dots per inch (read pixels per inch) - 6246px / (72 px/inch) = 86.75 inches = 220.25 cm - 4170px / (72 px/inch) =57.52 inches = 147.11 cm If you change the dpi to 300, uncheck the Resample box the image resolution of 6246 x 4170 px will not change, only the size of the output. - 6246px / (300 px/inch) = 20.82 inches = 52.88 cm - 4170px / (300 px/inch) =13.9 inches = 35.31 cm Now, let's say you save the above image at 300dpi and send that image to a printer to print a 12in x 8in print at 300dpi, then the printer will use an internal algorithm to down sample from 20.82in x 13.9in to 12in x 8in. OR You can take control of the down sample method by changing the resolution of the image in Affinity Pro (or whatever software you use) using the dialogue box in your previous post and changing the size of the image to 12in x 8in, changing dpi to 300, clicking the resample box and selecting the resample method / algorithm then saving the image. Often, after resampling, you may find you have to sharpen the image slightly to get the best printed output - especially if you are upsampling. Taking control of the process enables you to do this rather then relying on the printer.
    2 points
  6. Herco

    xpro3 travel lens

    It depends a bit on how long or wide you need the view angle to be and whether you still want to use the OVF or rely on the EVF. The 16-80 is a good lens but not especially great. In terms of image quality I'd prefer the 18-55 and pair it with a 14. That makes a great travel kit with only one filter size. If you don't mind a bit bigger, the 16-55/f2.8 is even slightly better than the 18-55 and it is weather resistant. If 16 is wide enough, you can forfeit on the 14 and get around with one lens. Fuji still has it's 18-135 which is relatively cheap as second-hand since the 16-80 arrived. It's not as good though and slower in aperture. In terms of image quality I'd rank the Fujinon standard zoom lenses as: 1. the 16-55/f2.8* 2. the 18-55/f2.8-4 3. the XC 15-50/f3.5-5.6 4. the 16-80/f4* 5. the 18-135/f3.5-5.6* 6. the XC 15-45/f3.5-5.6 The * marked will block a significant part of the OVF on an X-Pro3. Also bear in mind that the frame in the OVF gets really small above approx. 50mm. All lenses with variable aperture only have their fastest aperture at the widest point and quickly move to a slower aperture. The 18-55 e.g. is f2.8 at 18mm, but already f3.3 at 23mm and f4 at approx. 35mm (if memory serves me well). If you need a really longer solution than 80, the Tamron 18-300 was just introduced, but it's a bit of a big gun on an X-Pro3. Tamron has an excellent 17-70/f2.8 that seems perfect for APS-C, but we'll have to wait and see whether it will come for X-mount. Sigma is rumored to start offering X-mount lenses in 2022 and their recent 18-50/f2.8 is highly acclaimed for Sony E-mount APS-C, so hopefully that would be one of the first.
    2 points
  7. The XF16/f1.4 is one's of Fuji's best X-mount lenses together with the XF90/f2. I absolutely loved the 16/1.4. I wish you a lot of happy shooting and fun with your new kit.
    2 points
  8. My Shadow

    Introduce Yourself

    Hello all! I am a new FujiFilm user. I have been shooting with a Canon for about 10 years, and wanted a travel camera that was more than a point and shoot. After a ton of research, I landed on the X100V. I LOVE THIS CAMERA! Take it everywhere I go and it's a great alternative to lugging around my mirrorless with a giant 70-200mm lens on it. Happy to be here! Christopher "My Shadow"
    1 point
  9. cpX

    Fuji Birds

    1 point
  10. No, it doesn't work if you have pulled the ring to manual. The 14mm is a sharp lens by the way. You won't be disappointed.
    1 point
  11. Decide on your budget, add some more (for all of the things you will think you will need after you get a camera -- in-spite of whether you actually need them or not 😀). Once you do that, take a look here: https://fujifilm-x.com/en-us/products/cameras/ One of these will catch your eye. Ditto for the lenses. Check your local camera shop to see if they have some in stock. The various online sellers often have sales on the gear. Once you get a little closer, check back to make sure things are not too far off the mark, so to speak.
    1 point
  12. zook

    Mushrooms

    X-T20; K&F concept adapter PRO + Meyer Gorlitz Primoplan 58mm f/1.9; 1/500 f/2, ISO200, tripod; additional light MANFROTO Lumimuse LED3 (front) + BLACK DIAMOND Astro 250 (backlight)
    1 point
  13. zook

    Mushrooms

    X-T20; K&F concept adapter + m42/m39 adapter + Leica Ernst Leitz Wetzlar 9cm f/4.0 Elmar; 1/15; f/8; ISO200; tripod; additional light from above MANFROTO Lumimuse LED3
    1 point
  14. zook

    Mushrooms

    X-T20; K&F concept adapter + Tokina AT-X Pro 100mm f/2.8 Macro; 1/2; f/11; ISO100, tripod; natural sunbeam lasted 3 minutes...
    1 point
  15. zook

    The Cat Thread

    Turn the light off! X-T20; K&F concept adapter + ASAHI Macro-Takumar 1:4/50; 1/8; f8; ISO500; tripod
    1 point
  16. Lovely collections of black and white Images.
    1 point
  17. such a drastic shift in focus could only be an adapter issue IMO...check if your adapter has the latest firmware otherwise raise the problem to viltrox. you could check with a fuji lens just for confirmation, but i highly suspect it's an adapter issue
    1 point
  18. mdm

    image sharpness

    by the way Ruta you shouldn't ignore black & white photography ) https://drive.google.com/file/d/1E5iGA5h-rbcVwjeqPf_6u5yLU4DzOmS9/view?usp=sharing
    1 point
  19. mdm

    image sharpness

    It is ok and I like it, just need a touch of PP. Just a little bit.
    1 point
  20. jerryy

    image sharpness

    The EXIF settings are below the image on the left side. The lens name is missing though, but just guessing from the entry for Maximum Aperture = 4.0, it could be a 35mm or a short zoom. As Greybeard mentions, the low-res version as well as the larger version looks okay. Some things to note: 1.) The x and y resolutions are set to 72 dpi. On a computer screen which uses 96dpi or 120 dpi, you can run into some scaling issues from the monitor’s display algorithms that can make it seem softer than it is. 2.) You are shooting at f4, which does not have a deep depth of field such as what you may expect coming from cell phone cameras. What that means is that some parts of the image will seem soft or out of focus compared to others depending on the selected focus point — for example: the pen is fine, the letters seem soft. Try using f8 or f11 or even f 14 as a minimum for this shot and see if you get “sharper” images. Depth of field is an artistic effect that takes some getting used to. HTH.
    1 point
  21. andrei89

    image sharpness

    There is a bit of softness from what i can tell… can you post the settings used for that particular image and what lens you used?
    1 point
  22. I think the difference is more a matter of perception, of what looks acceptable. That's why the 100S has two different settings for the depth of field scale. On 6x9 film I rarely made prints larger than 16"x20" and distant backgrounds looked sharp. With the 100S I can see that the background is not sharp when I look at a file 100% on screen, but it looks perfectly fine in a 17"x22" print. My concern is that I want the files to hold up for larger print sizes, which was never a concern with 6x9 film.
    1 point
  23. The 50/f1 and the 90/f2 are quite specialist lenses. Esp. the 90 is great, but for portraits you'd have to maintain a fair distance to get a classic portrait. It's also a difficult lens to nail focus at f2. I consider the 50/f1 as a 'hype' lens. It's very expensive and the image quality trails that of the 56/f1.2. I guess Fuji just needed something with an f1 aperture as a halo-product, when they realized that the previously announced 33/f1 became too big. For weddings and events an f1 is close to useless, since the DOF is so shallow, it becomes hard to nail focus in fast changing environments. You'll find yourself stopping down to f2.8 or f4 most of the time. Three lenses come to mind: the 50/f2 is highly underrated and can get you a bit better background separation compared to the 18-55 at f4. However, if you really want to experiment with shallow DOF, the 56/f1.2 is a great lens. Second-hand prices have dropped somewhat since the 50/f1 (but not much). A bit more universal might be the 33/f1.4. That gives you a clear distance from the f3.6 the kit lens offers at 35mm. A similar choice would be the 35/f1.4 (buy it second-hand, prices are dropping now). For video use, the 35/f1.4 and the 56/f1.2 are less practical. They have a slow AF performance, suffer a bit from focus breathing and are quite noisy when focusing. In that case, use a directional mic instead of the build-in mics and refrain from focus pulling. The 33/f1.4 and the 50/f2 work perfect for video.
    1 point
  24. andrei89

    xpro3 travel lens

    16-80 plus the 35 1.4…i add the 70-300 or the 50-230 (which is on sale since the 70-300 arrived) for my tele needs not on the x-pro3 but on the x-s10 if it makes any difference
    1 point
  25. You have so set „Shoot without lens“ to on in the setup menu.
    1 point
  26. After reading some horror stories of batteries swelling up after being charged in the camera (and they couldn't be removed), I bought a set of two Neewer NP-W126 batteries with a double charger from Amazon. Didn't notice the "S" was missing from the end, but since the original battery didn't last all that long, I figured 3 batteries would be better than one. It turned out fine. I do a lot of wildlife shooting and one battery will definitely not last all day. The original battery lasts longer than the Neewers, but not so much that the difference is worth the extra expense. The charger will run off a USB-C or micro USB cable so it's compatible with almost anything and it will work in the field if necessary. Note: I never shoot 4K video, but if I did I would probably use stock batteries or an external USB-C power bank.
    1 point
  27. The NP-W126S batteries replaced the original NP-W126 about 5 years - supposedly they manage heat better - especially useful for 4K video. I use an external charger but it's probably more habit than anything else. After taking photos I remove the card and the battery. Stick the battery in a charger and the card in a card reader.
    1 point
  28. Same thing happens to me. If I'm trying to send a full size jpeg, it disconnects. I am on Android 11, OnePlus 7 Pro, shooting on an XT3. I only shoot RAW, then convert to JPEG after on the camera so I can send to my phone and edit. This stopped working at some point, only way I can successfully transfer photos is if I turn the "resize" back on which heavily compresses the image. This workflow used to work on the same phone. Not sure what happened but I am experiencing the same as you.
    1 point
  29. sofiabelle

    Mushrooms

    Nice pictures of mushrooms. I like the mushrooms most.
    1 point
  30. I think the answer to this question depends on the criteria used to measure "success". And also success for who? For Fujifilm? For you? For me? I can't find any sources that breakout sales for Fuji cameras by model, and of course it would be impossible to know what Fujifilm's criteria for success might be, even if we had that information. It has always struck me since becoming aware of X Series cameras that Fuji seems to attach a great deal of value to the design proposition of Electronic Range Finder cameras. It's a pretty distinct form for modern mirrorless cameras and they might value the distinction so much that break-even or even a manageable loss on X100 and X-Pro lines is totally worth it to them. Maybe for you or other X-Pro2 users, the X-Pro3 isn't compelling enough for an upgrade. I get that. The X-Pro2 strikes me as a great camera. In fact I decided to get the X-Pro2 and was saving my money when they introduced the 3. So I am totally into that being a thing. For me, the X-Pro3 is a total success. I have never owned a digital or mirrorless camera before buying the X-Pro3. The details that others dismiss as gimmicks were compelling enough for me to want them. The sub monitor doesn't feel or look like a gimmick to me at all. I like it. People who ask about my camera are always surprised and delighted by that detail. They are fascinated by the fact the LCD folds down and out. I like this too. I don't want to even be tempted to chimp, but it's super nice to have a screen available that isn't smeared with skin oil when I want to double check a result or make a wait-level photo if I'm unable to crouch or kneel. I purchased the FUJINON XF16mmF2.8 R WR as my first lens because I love the wideness. Is it a problem the viewfinder doesn't have framelines for this? It hasn't been for me. Maybe because of the way I compose things? Maybe I don't care? I certainly never once was "disappointed" or found myself wishing for those framelines. I also use adapted Pentax Takumar M42 screw mount lenses on the camera, including a Super Takumar 300mm F4. Does using this long lens make the "rangefinder" useless? Not entirely. You certainly have to trust that what you saw before you brought the camera to your eye will still be the case for the lower right of the frame. But that's where the functionality and flexibility of the ERF is so great: A simple push or pull of the viewfinder mode lever lets me see the electronic view. I can switch back and forth if I want. I can stay electronic if I want. I can have both. And I don't have to be "pure" or do one or the other. I can just do what I want. It's not just looks, or living a rangefinder-pure life that the X-Pro3 brings, but wonderful flexibility. The instrument helps me and facilitates me. This camera makes me want to pick up and shoot. It inspires me and instills me with confidence. X-Pro3 a success? For me it absolutely is. https://youpic.com/photographer/JonWhipple/
    1 point
  31. A kind of 'poor mans M10' would certainly make sense. I can't imagine there are many video shooters amongst X-Pro users and certainly not who bought the camera specifically for video shooting. So getting rid of all the video features probably doesn't affect the target group. Fuji however, needs to really 'focus' on stills photographers and get the camera exactly right for them.
    1 point
  32. Great! Another convert! The more the merrier.
    1 point
  33. Welcome to our forum 🙂
    1 point
  34. This is most likely one of the known issues with the X-Pro2. I've had this on one of my two X-Pro2 copies and I've also heard this from others. The issue is the on/off switch. Though Fuji claims the camera is weather resistant, the sealing of the shutter button and it's collar isn't great and moisture can affect the contacts of the on/off button. Another similar weak point is the WR sealing of the back rear dial that can affect the push function of that rear dial. If it gets worse, you can have it serviced.
    1 point
  35. Why don't you give darktable a go. It is now a great raw developper and it is free.
    1 point
  36. Menu Button->Set Up (the wrench icon)->Button/Dial Settings->Function (Fn) Setting From here, scroll to page 2 and change Fn-D to the second default which changes the left dial to exposure compensation only when in manual mode.
    1 point
  37. Yes, physical dials please. Yes, I'm old, and yes, I'm old school in that regard. A 100R might convince me to invest in the big lenses and lug them around. I would even settle for a revamped 50R with IBIS- I like that idea too.
    1 point
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  39. 1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. You will not be disappointed with either of these lenses I can assure you of that!
    1 point
  43. Only thing missing is the film camera options. In addition to all my digital (9camera) I have the gw690
    1 point
  44. XF lenses do not work on GFX cameras. Their image circle isn't large enough to cover the sensor. An APS-C lens covers about 25% of a GFX sensor. Some full frame lenses work with a GFX but only restricted to a smaller part of the image (about 70% of the GFX sensor). I've worked with the GFX50S and shortly with the GFX100 for fashion and portraits. The combination of the 32-64 and the 110 works very well. Alternative is the 45-100. For landscape I can recommend the 23. Combine that with the 45-100 and you have a nice kit covering most. You also mention longer glass (XF50-140). Note that for GFX there's essentially one longer prime lens: the GF250, which is a bit shorter than 140mm in APS-C equiv.) and one zoom: the 100-200 (a bit over 100mm in APS-C). Both are massive and quite a burden to carry around. Fuji claims that the GFX100S is only slightly larger than a full frame mirrorless, but that's only half the story. When you take the lenses into account it is considerably larger and heavier to carry around compared to full frame. Although the GFX platform by design is well-suited for landscape, there's only one native real landscape lens (23). I guess there's room for a wider lens there. There are some third party options but at a lower quality standard (and price level).
    1 point
  45. What are you "voting" on? Listing what one owns is not voting. It is a simple statement of fact.
    1 point
  46. Fujifilm X100F ISO 12,800 (Yes. That's correct!), 1/50 sec, f/4.0, Handheld, Available Light from LHS Window
    1 point
  47. This is my first post, Hello! A few miles from where I live is the Dee Estuary, the River Dee being the original border of England and Wales. On the English side is the village of Heswall and the river there consists mainly of mud flats. I've posted a small selection of photos I took earlier today of some abandoned boats in various states of disrepair. This is one of those places where I always think better photos can be had when the weather is a bit more on the gloomy side. Unfortunately, today has been warm and sunny! boat at heswall by Glyn Morton, on Flickr boat at heswall by Glyn Morton, on Flickr cabin by Glyn Morton, on Flickr boat at heswall by Glyn Morton, on Flickr boat at heswall, detail by Glyn Morton, on Flickr skipper by Glyn Morton, on Flickr Thanks very much for looking, Glyn
    1 point
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