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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/2021 in Posts

  1. Welcome @dgeorge959. Both are excellent cameras and depending on the lens you're using, they should be very suitable for landscapes too. Image quality is the same. I've had both and I've also used them professionally for a while. Just a short list of the most significant differences that I can recall. - There's obviously quite a difference in the form factor of the camera. The H1 has a deep grip and is a bit less 'retro-styled'. For long handheld shoots I prefer the H1, but you can also mount a grip to the T2 to reach more or less similar. However, mounting a grip on the T2 doesn't change the position of the shutter release button and that is again a way better experience with the H1 for long handheld shooting. Of course this is all moot, when you use a tripod; - The H1 is a bit more robust built and has slightly better weather-sealing. It is more aimed at 'pro-use'. The outer coating is more resistant to scratches and markings. The mount is more robust to better handle large lenses like the 200mm and the 100-400 zoom. The result is that the H1 is a bit bigger and heavier, but compared to your 5D still small; - The H1 has an annoying bug in some series: occasionally you get read/write errors when writing to the SD Cards. The only way out is to switch off and on the camera. Always use the Fuji recommended SD cards, insert/eject with care (camera switched off) and format the cards in the camera (every time after transferring the files). But even then... I've had 3 H1's over 3 years time and 2 of them had the recurring issue. Fuji wasn't able to fix it. I never heard of T2's with the similar recurring issue, but the T3 has it as well. Many Fuji-users have never experienced it, but it's an annoying issue for a small group; - Obviously the H1 has IBIS (in-body image stabilization) but that is less relevant for landscape shooting. However, even when you turn it off, the H1 uses noticeable more battery power than the T2. So, while they use the same battery, you really want at least 1 or 2 spare batteries with the H1; - The H1 has the top sub-LCD which I always found very handy. However, this comes at the expense of the exposure compensation dial on the T2 top plate. The H1 has a button combined with the front- or rear dial for Exp. Comp. It's a matter of preference and getting used to; - The H1 has a touch screen as LCD. Fortunately you can switch it off entirely, because it's not a very good one (slow, lagging and sometimes non-responsive). It takes up battery life as well. In landscape photography it can be a nice feature to select focus points (when on tripod) and release the shutter, but most users I know, switch it off anyway; - The H1 has Bluetooth connectivity to the Fuji app (the T2 only Wifi). Bluetooth works way better, but the Fuji app is still 'crap' so you might not need it. A real significant difference though is the EVF. The H1 has a visibly much better EVF with higher resolution but also, more importantly. a higher refresh rate resulting in smoother movements and less noise in low-light situations; - The AF is more or less the same, but the H1 was designed for high speed action/sports. In my experience the AF of the H1 reacts a bit quicker when a subject is moving (less threshold) but the result is that specifically with eye-AF the H1 can sometimes erratically switch between eyes with only the slightest movement. The T2 is a bit more 'relaxed' and as a result sometimes works better in AF-C mode. However, with landscape this might not interest you at all; - More important is that the H1 allows you to change the behavior of the manual focus ring on the lens. Not only the direction, but also the response (linear vs. non-linear). When you work with MF (like many do in landscape photography) linear MF allows you to control the ring way better. The focus shift isn't depending anymore on the speed with which you move the ring (like it is with non-linear). The T2 only supports non-linear. Some of the Fujinon lenses have a focus clutch with hard stops on the lens (the 14/2.8, the 16/1.4 and the old 23/1.4. For those lenses it doesn't make a difference. - Both cameras a popular on the second-hand market, but the H1 a bit more. So, expect to pay a premium for an H1 in very good condition. The difference is easily $200-300 between comparable T2's and H1's. I hope this has helped you a bit to make a choice
    2 points
  2. I see two separate discussions here: (1) whether full-frame (FF) is actually 'better' than cropped sensors (APS-C) and (2) whether Fujifilm should enter the FF market. (1) in terms of image quality, bigger sensors have an advantage over smaller sensors. It's basic physics (and electronics). It depends however on comparing sensors of similar generations. A 10y old design is most likely less in terms of IQ than a recent design. You need to compare apples with apples... Whether or not the difference in IQ is visible, is a totally different matter. That depends on quality of the rest of the camera, quality of lenses, quality and size of the viewing screen or prints, ability of the photographer... et cetera. Whether the difference in IQ matters is an even more personal question. That is a matter of budget, weight and size you're willing to carry, personal preference for a camera brand or the purpose of use... A landscape stills camera has different requirements than a fast action sports hybrid camera... So, technically a bigger sensor generally has better IQ than a smaller sensor, but there are many more factors that determine the 'best camera for you'. (2) Fujifilm is a fairly large corporate, but the camera division in itself isn't particularly large. It's smaller than e.g. Nikon's and Panasonic's imaging divisions and more than 5x smaller than Sony's imaging division. Moreover, back in the late 2000's, the camera division of Fujifilm was on the brink of being closed. The X-system was the 'last attempt' to address the photographers market and they succeeded. In itself that was a great success, because the market for digital cameras (compact + interchangeable lens cameras) shrunk with more than 90% between 2010 and 2020. Their bet to stay close to affordable, but good quality ILCs paid off. They found a niche market and by focusing on that market (compact APS-C cameras, a decent lens line, retro styling and film simulations) they became the dominant player next to Sony. By 2015 Fujifilm made the decision to launch a digital cropped medium format. That wasn't strange, since in the days of film Fujifilm medium format cameras had a good reputation for being rugged and affordable whereas in the 35mm camera market Fujica was a 'B-brand' at best. Again, MF is a niche market in which they could become a dominant player. Also note that Fujifilm doesn't manufacture it's own sensors. They buy from Sony. That means that they will always be a little behind in terms of the latest generation of sensors. Usually 6-9 months. Now, when entering the FF market it's like you enter the shark pool. It takes a lot of money and other resources to succeed and even then be only #3 or #4 in the market. Imagine: you not only have to design and produce a range of cameras, but also the accompanying lenses. None of the X-mount lenses will cover a FF-sensor. All of the GF-mount lenses are too big and slow for FF (but great for MF). Next to that, when you want a professional FF-system, you have to set-up a world-wide Professional Support Service that operates 24/7 and is present at all large events (Olympics, World Cups, UN, EU, WEF, G7 and G20 events... you name it). That is very different from their current basic FPS for a handful of MF fashion photographers... ;-). So, I guess that Fujifilm gladly forfeits the FF-market and focuses on markets where they can be a dominant player. Given their size and the shrinking of the market, I think that is a smart strategy.
    2 points
  3. The RP is "full frame" like all those '90s era stereo receivers that were "digital ready." Its made of plastic, not WR, its DR is poor, AF nothing special; its sensor tech is generations behind even for Canon. It lacks IBIS, in addition to anything like the full scan 4K of the X-T4. A more apt comparison would be to the R6, which is a pretty compelling camera-except for the part where it's most of a grand more than a T4. And then there's RF glass which, while optically stellar, makes Fuji lenses seem downright thrifty in price. Fuji makes really great APS-C cameras, and really great medium format cameras. Lots of companies make really great full frame cameras, so I think Fuji is in the right to go the way they are.
    2 points
  4. I guess you may well have discovered him already but if not check out Andy Mumford's youtube channel lots of fujifilm reviews and inspirational videos mostly aimed at landscape photographers.
    1 point
  5. jerryy

    Fall pictures

    With autumn closing in ... The temperature is still hot to very hot, but the days are getting shorter, and some few of the tree leaves are starting to change colors and the berry bushes / trees are kicking out fruit for migrating birds to munch on while they pass through on their way to winter homes.
    1 point
  6. @VictorM I see you already got the X-E3 and I have this camera and love it. I also have the GFX50R which I think is a great landscape camera. It's big, it's heavy and therefore it is what I call my intentional camera, I pick it up when I'm going out specifically for a shoot. My X-E3 on the other hand is light and when over my shoulder easy to forget about, it my everyday carry everywhere camera.
    1 point
  7. My change from a Canon DSLR to a Fuji X-T2 was driven by size and weight because I travel (backpack) and hike often. My Canon set-up included a 15-85mm, a 50mm, a 90mm and a 70-300mm but the 15-85 was my go-to lens. I loved the zoom range and the fact I didn't need to change lenses often... whether I was taking landscapes in the mountains (without tripod), architecture in cities or candid portraits. I took advantage of a "try before you buy" program for Fuji at my local camera store and fell in love with the XF23mm f/2 so decided to pair it with the XF14mm. I've been very impressed with the sharpness and colour that both lenses produce. Other lens variables can, if required, be corrected in post (Capture One does a much better job with RAF files than LR - especially for foliage). A year later, I did another "try before you buy" to test the XF10-24. I loved the extra wide end and being able to zoom through this range BUT after getting used to the diminutive Fuji primes, found the 10-24 big and heavy to use / carry. In my usage, it produced satisfying images throughout the zoom range (and I am a pixel peeper who studies MTF charts and the like before buying) although I would agree, slightly softer at the long end. All that to say, I doubt you'd be disappointed with either the XF10-24 or any of the Fuji primes. While I've heard good things about the Rokinon/Samyang primes, I've not tried them and it should be noted they are manual focus only. For me, I'm staying with my smaller, lighter primes... it just suits where I am with my photography right now. I can also tell you I LOVE my X-T2 and would only trade it in for the X-T4.
    1 point
  8. RobertE

    Trains (open thread)

    Jerryy, I really like your train photos. I've seen the RJ Corman diesels in New Philadelphia, OH. Perhaps you can label future photos with the area they were taken in? Many thanks for sharing. Robert
    1 point
  9. An excellent combination. I owned several X-T2 cameras and the 10-24 is a good match for this body size. Also, although this range has evolved to the X-T4, the improvements are not huge over the X-T2. So this seems like a good choice for an introduction to Fujifilm. Best of luck! Ian.
    1 point
  10. The 10-24 is a great landscape lens. Often zoom lenses have a strong and a weak end and with the 10-24 the strong end is definitely towards the 10mm end, which is usually great for landscape. The 8-16 is an expensive alternative. I would only recommend it if you really need the f2.8 and the 8mm end. It requires special filterholders as well, which makes it even more expensive. It is good, though you need to stop down to f5.6 for best performance. Wide open it suffers a bit from vignetting and distortion, which is well corrected afterwards but correction always affects image quality in corners and edges. It’s also a bulky lens due to its nature. As for primes the most obvious choices are the 14/2.8 and the 16/1.4. The 16/1.4 is one of Fuji’s best XF lenses, but the 14 isn’t far behind. Both have the focus clutch that allows you to manually focus with hard stops. Great for landscape. A lesser known alternative is the Zeiss Touit 12/2.8 for X-mount. This is a fantastic lens. It has the great Zeiss color rendering and contrast. You only need to be a bit aware of potential flare and ghosting. So be careful whenever the sun is in the frame. I have no experience with the Samyang/Rokinon lenses for Fuji. There seems to be a great 10mm prime… It’s only manual focus though…
    1 point
  11. novum verum

    Introduce Yourself

    Hello! Let me start of by saying I'm very new to digital photography and videography. Back in August, 2020, I decided to start a YouTube channel to review bluetooth devices, and of course I needed a decent camera to work with. After a couple of weeks of research, I picked up the Fujifilm X-T200 -- by all accounts, the best entry-level camera at the time. Mind you, although I have some experience with SLRs and PAS cameras in the past, I haven't touched a real camera in over a decade (phones don't count). After a few days playing around with the X-T200, I was hooked! My videos were coming out great! And even though my phone could film in 4K, what I captured on my X-T200 was so much better! Recently, I've wanted to explore street photography and macro photography. These new interests got me started looking at lenses and other accessories. And while I was at it, I decided to upgrade my camera as well -- I found the X-T200 to be very power-hungry, and tended to overheat rather quickly. So I went and picked up the X-S10 a couple of weeks ago, along with a couple of prime lenses. IBIS and much improved power consumption were the biggest selling points (and the approachable price, of course). Unfortunately, that's the reason why I joined this forum -- to get some answers or at least some help with my X-S10. Thanks in advance!!
    1 point
  12. What do you thing to add your work on Wikipedia ? i stat some day ago something similar on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujifilm_X-mount#:~:text=Pro%3B 26 mm-,Third Party X mount lenses comparizon,-[48][edit]
    1 point
  13. I encountered the same problem with my XT30. ES and Video (even on F-Log) works. Can't remember if the camera is heating up more or faster than it usually does but it does really heat up at the bottom right side of the body, where the battery should be. Please help, I haven't tried using it again out of fear it might get worse. Thank you so much!
    1 point
  14. It's not particularly the size and weight of the cameras. It's the size and weight of the lenses that makes a difference.
    1 point
  15. Fujifilm have been very astute in not joining the full frame market which is saturated with Sony, Nikon, Panasonic, Pentax, Canon, Leica - have I missed anyone else? Fuji are a big company but with a relatively small camera division. They have found their niche.
    1 point
  16. I am sorry but I cannot support the current trend for full frame sensors. Thankfully one manufacturer is not chasing full frame. I was a Canon and Nikon user. The Canon and Nikon full frame mirrorless cameras are too heavy and expensive which is why I switched to Fuji. Do not force Fuji to waste its R&D on full frame. Bigger sensors result in more mega-pixels needing more powerful PCs to edit the images meaning more expense. The images from my X-S10 are as good as the images from my friends Canon R6.
    1 point
  17. Sir Grey

    Leica Monochom envy

    I can't help but feel envious when I hear such praise about Leica being so "innovative" and "daring". Leica releases a camera with no screen and it's marvel for those that want one less distraction while photographing. Fuji does a similar move with the X-pro 3 and it's divisive, even though you still get a screen if you don't want one. That leads me to my main point that I still want Fuji to release a monochrome camera. Sure, could I save up and buy Leica? Sure, but I think the Fuji system offers more to me than just price. I think they always have more value than leica in terms of features, and I think Fuji is more humble as a brand, where they don't flaunt their brand as a luxury class item. Anyway, I hope to see a monochrome sensor Fuji camera in the future.
    1 point
  18. 1 point
  19. fujfinder

    Trains (open thread)

    1907 Baldwin Engine Fuji X100F
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
  22. I had this same problem, and after trying a lot of things, I tried a different cable, and it did the trick. It may be that the cable that comes with the camera is not Apple-certified, so the computer doesn't recognize it. I've had this happen with other devices.
    0 points
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