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Complete Overview over the available and upcoming Fuji X-Mount lenses

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Fujinon (Native Lenses) (29 in total)

Fujinon lens designation translation: R: aperture ring - - LM: linear motor - - OIS: optical image stabilization - - WR: weather resistant - - APD: apodization filter - - - - Super EBC: electron beam coating, also called electron beam physical vapor deposition

 

Prime Lenses (15 lenses)

 

XF 14mm F2.8 R product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 m - Magnification: 1:8.33 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 58,4 mm - Weight: 235 g - Price (approx.): €880/$700

Currently the widest prime in the native lens lineup. It’s said to be very sharp, but now that the XF 16mm F1.4 R WR is out, which is not much more expensive, two stops faster and weather resistant, it should be considered if the extra 2mm wide angle are really needed. The manual focus ring can be pulled back to engage manual focus mode, and reveals depth of field and distance scales. (Reviews at Fuji vs. Fuji, Fuji X-Files)

 

XF 16mm F1.4 R WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: 1:4.76 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 73,4 mm - Length: 73 mm - Weight: 375 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$850

Close-to-perfect wide angle lens, relatively high magnification due to short close focus distance, even weather resistant. Has the same manual focus mechanism as the XF 14mm F2.8 R. Only optical downside seems to be coma in the corners when wide open (bad for astrophotography). Quite big and expensive. (Reviews at Fstoppers, the digital trekker, Admiring Light)

 

XF 18mm F2.0 R product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 m - Magnification: 1:7 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 64,5 mm - Length: 40,6 mm - Weight: 116 g - Price (approx.): €410/$450

One of the original three prime lenses from the beginning of the X-System. Very small and light. The varying rating of the optical quality throughout many reviews suggests copy-to-copy variation. The autofocus motor used in this lens is slightly noisy compared to the virtually silent linear motors of most other Fujinon lenses. (Reviews at The Phoblographer, light priority, MacLean Photographic)

 

XF 23mm F2.0 R WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,22 m - Magnification: 1:7.7 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 43 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 51,9 mm - Weight: 180 g - Price (approx.): €499/$449

Following the success of the XF 35mm F2.0 R WR, Fujifilm released this weather resistant medium-wide-angle prime lens, designed for rangefinder cameras. (Reviews at Jonas Rask (many images) and The Phoblographer, Comparison with the XF 23mm F1.4 R at IVAN Joshua Loh)

 

XF 23mm F1.4 R product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,28 m - Magnification: 1:10 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 72 mm - Length: 63 mm - Weight: 300 g - Price (approx.): €890/$750

Excellent fast medium-wide-angle prime. Have not heard anything bad about it. Has the same manual focus mechanism as the XF 14mm F2.8 R. (Reviews at la RO QUE, kwerfeldein (german), Dan Bailey)

 

XM-FL (24mm F8.0)

Close Focus Distance: 1 m - Magnification: 1:41 - Aperture Blades: none (fixed) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 21 mm - Weight: 32 g - Price (approx.): €/$85

Fixed aperture, fixed focus body cap filter lens (soft filter & cross filter). Sharp from approximately 1 m to infinity. So far only available in Japan. (Reviews at ReViewed, DSLR Magazine (translation by Google), Infos at PetaPixel, Video from CP+ 2015 at News STC (youtube))

 

XF 27mm F2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,34 m - Magnification: 1:10 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 39 mm - Diameter: 61,2 mm - Length: 23 mm - Weight: 78 g - Price (approx.): €350/$250

The smallest and lightest X-Mount lens, apart from the bodycap filter lens. Optically not perfect, but still quite good when stopped down (most say from f/4 downwards). Has no aperture ring. Has a slightly noisy autofocus motor, in contrast to the virtually silent linear motors used in most other lenses. (Reviews at Tom Grill, Stephen Ip, photozone , LensTip)

 

XF 35mm F2.0 R WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,35 m - Magnification: 1:7.4 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 43 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 46 mm - Weight: 170 g - Price (approx.): €400/$400

Weather resistant normal prime lens. Designed for rangefinder cameras. It's short and gets narrower to the front, so it does not stick into the viewfinder frame. (Reviews at IvanJoshuaLoh, lenstip and FujiRumors (by Rico Pfirstinger) )

 

XF 35mm F1.4 R product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,28 m - Magnification: 1:5.88 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 54,9 mm - Weight: 187 g - Price (approx.): €590/$400

One of the original three prime lenses from the beginning of the X-System. Very sharp in the center, mediocre corner sharpness wide open gets a lot better when stopped down from F/1.4 through F/8. Anyway, a good normal prime lens for the X-System. Only downside seemed to be the slow-ish autofocus, but that was addressed with a firmware upgrade.Has a slightly noisy autofocus motor, in contrast to the virtually silent linear motors used in most other lenses. (Reviews at pixelogist, Colin Nicholls, photographylife; Comparison with the Zeiss Touit 1.8/32 at Admiring Light)

 

XF 50mm F2.0 R WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,39m - Magnification: 1:6.7 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 59,4 mm - Weight: 200 g - Price (approx.): €500/$500

The third lens in Fujifilm's lineup of compact, weather resistant prime lenses. Keeps up with the other two. (Reviews at Johannes Morsbach, fstoppers and caveira photography)

 

XF 56mm F1.2 R product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,7 m - Magnification: 1:11.11 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 73 mm - Length: 70 mm - Weight: 405 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$900

The 85mm fullframe equivalent portrait prime in the lens lineup. As tested by Admiring Light, quite close to perfect. (Reviews at Admiring Light, Nathan Elson, Olaf Photoblog, Jonas Jacobsson)

 

XF 56mm F1.2 R APD product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,7 m - Magnification: 1:11.11 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 73 mm - Length: 70 mm - Weight: 405 g - Price (approx.): €1300/$1200

Same as above, but with built in apodization filter (radial, gradual neutral density filter that gets darker towards the corners) to smoothen out the bokeh at the expense of lens brightness. Instead of f/1.2, the maximum light transmissivity is equivalent to t/1.7. This effect is neutralized at f/5.6. A very unique portrait prime, but it does not support phase detection autofocus. (Comparison between APD and non-APD version at Fuji vs. Fuji)

 

XF 60mm F2.4 R Makro product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,27 m - Magnification: 1:2 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 39 mm - Diameter: 64,1 mm - Length: 70,9 mm - Weight: 215 g - Price (approx.): €600/$450

One of the original three prime lenses from the beginning of the X-System, and the first macro lens, although the maximum magnification is only 1:2. It is very sharp, but has really slow autofocus. Works well for portraits and stationary subjects like product photography or flowers. When approaching living subjects like bugs, the focal length, and thus the close focus distance, might be too short. Has a slightly noisy autofocus motor, like the XF 27mm F2.8 and the XF 35mm F1.4 R. (Reviews at ishootshows, daisuki photo, The Phoblographer)

 

XF 80mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR Macro product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25m - Magnification: 1:1 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 130 mm - Weight: 750 g - Price (approx.): €1300/$1200

The first native 1:1 macro lens for the X-system. This is an impressively sharp lens with a very well working optical stabilizer. The AF is quick, even in the macro range, and does not hunt much.

 

XF 90mm F2.0 R LM WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,6 m - Magnification: 1:5 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 75 mm - Length: 105 mm - Weight: 540 g - Price (approx.): €900/$950

A pretty outstanding short telephoto prime lens, if you like the focal length. (Reviews at Jonas Rask, macfilos; Comparison with the XF 56mm F1.2 R at Tools & Toys)

 

 

Zoom Lenses (12 lenses)

 

XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,13 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 62,6 mm - Length: 44,2 mm - Weight: 135 g - Price (approx.): €299/$299

First powerzoom lens for Fujifilm X-Mount cameras.

 

XC 16-50mm F3.5-5.6 OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:6.67 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 62,6 mm - Length: 65,2 mm - Weight: 195 g - Price (approx.): €320/$340

The cheapest zoom lens for the X-Mount, intended as a standard zoom kit lens for the cheaper entry level bodies. No aperture ring, no switch for OIS. Quite small and light. Compared to the XF 18-55mm F/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS, it sacrifices about one stop of light through the whole focal length range, as well as 5mm of focal length at the long end, but gains important 2mm of wide angle. (Reviews at Admiring Light, Imaging Resource)

 

XC 16-50mm II F3.5-5.6 OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: 1:7 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 62,6 mm - Length: 65,2 mm - Weight: 195 g - Price (approx.): €--/$--

New version, bundled with the new Fujifilm X-A2. Better build quality, closer minimum focus distance.

 

XC 50-230mm F4.5-6.7 OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 1,1 m - Magnification: 1:5 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 70 mm - Length: 111 mm - Weight: 375 g - Price (approx.): €250/$400

This cheap telephoto zoom lens is a bit smaller and quite a bit lighter than the XF 55-200mm F/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS and has no aperture ring. But depending on the intended use, the slower aperture range needs to be taken into consideration. (Reviews at macingosh, riflessifotografici; Comparison with the XF 55-200 F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS at Colin Nicholls)

 

XC 50-230mm II F4.5-6.7 OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 1,1 m - Magnification: 1:5 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 69,5 mm - Length: 111 mm - Weight: 375 g - Price (approx.): €--/$--

New version, bundled with the new Fujifilm X-A2. Better optical stabilization than the predecessor (3.5 stops instead of 3 stops)

 

XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,45 m - Magnification: 1:3.7 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 75,7 mm - Length: 97,8 mm - Weight: 490 g - Price (approx.): €800/$750

Fuji's take on a weather resistant always-on travelzoom. Optically, it seems to be good for what it is, but the aperture range does not impress, which is of course a compromise for smaller size and lower weight. (Reviews at Dan Bailey, Admiring Light, The Phoblographer)

 

XF 18-55mm F2.8-4.0 R LM OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:6.67 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 70,4 mm - Weight: 310 g - Price (approx.): €700/$600

Is said to be the standard zoom "kit" lens for the X-Mount. My experience says, it's much better than the usual APS-C kit lens. Rather comparable to the f/4 L kit lenses canon sells with its full frame cameras. The aperture range is good, the size and weight is perfect, optical image stabilization works very well, and the lens is sharp. Really nothig to complain, especially since it comes at about 350-400€ when bought as a kit. (Reviews at Mark Schueler, photomadd, la RO QUE)

 

XF 55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 1,1 m - Magnification: 1:5.56 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 75 mm - Length: 118 mm - Weight: 580 g - Price (approx.): €670/$550

This lens does not have the reach of the cheaper XC 50-230mm F/4.5-6.7 OIS, but with an aperture range from 3.5 to 4.8 it is a lot brighter, and therefore much more usable for the common telephoto applications (a.k.a. wildlife). Very compact when collapsed, and doubles as acceptable macro lens when combined with a +3 diopters achromat. This lens is very sharp wide open, even at the long end. (Reviews at Admiring Light, prophotonut (NSFW), Steeve Marcoux)

 

XF 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR product page

Close Focus Distance:1,75m - Magnification: 1:5.26 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 95 mm - Length: 210 mm - Weight: 1375 g - Price (approx.): €1800/$1800

An outstanding long telephoto zoom lens, offering 5 stops of optical image stabilization. It is sharper when focused close, but the sharpness at infinity focus can be regained when closing the aperture down to f/8. This lens is compatible with the 1.4x and 2x teleconverter. With the 2x teleconverter attached, all current camera models lose phase detection autofocus and have to use contrast detection autofocus. (Reviews at Bill Fortney, Admiring Light, Mindshard part 1 part 2 and Glazer's Camera)

 

XF 10-24mm F4.0 R OIS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,24 m - Magnification: 1:6.25 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 72 mm - Diameter: 78 mm - Length: 87 mm - Weight: 410 g - Price (approx.): €950/$850

The widest lens in the Fujinon X-Mount lineup. Nothing bad to say about this one, too. (Reviews at Leigh Miller, Alik Griffin, photography life, photomadd)

 

XF 16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:6.25 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 83,3 mm - Length: 106 mm - Weight: 655 g - Price (approx.): €1100/$1100

The pro-oriented standard zoom lens. Very good build and image quality, but also very big, heavy and expensive compared to the XF 18-55mm F/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS. The 2mm shorter focal length at the wide end, as well as the fixed aperture and the weather sealing might be the decisive factors for buying this lens instead of the XF 18-55mm F/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS, which in turn has optical image stabilization. (Reviews at photography life, Jonas Jacobsson; Comparison with the XF 18-55mm F/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS at Admiring Light)

 

XF 50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR product page

Close Focus Distance: 1 m - Magnification: 1:8.33 - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 72 mm - Diameter: 82,9 mm - Length: 175,9 mm - Weight: 995 g - Price (approx.): €1500/$1500

The pro-oriented medium telezoom lens. The image quality of this lens is beyond question, but it's the biggest, heaviest and also most expensive lens apart from the new 100-400. It is compatible with the 1.4x and 2x teleconverters. Cameras retain phase detection autofocus with this lens and the 2x teleconverter attached. (Reviews at Dan Bailey, Jonas Rask)

 

 

Cine Lenses (2 lenses)

 

MKX 18-55mm T2.9 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,38 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded, stepless) - Filter Thread: 82 mm - Diameter: 87 mm - Length: 207 mm - Weight: 1080 g - Price (approx.): €3999/$3999

Fuji's new beginner line of fixed aperture cine lenses. (Review at nofilmschool)

 

MKX 50-135mm T2.9 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,85 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded, stepless) - Filter Thread: 82 mm - Diameter: 87 mm - Length: 207 mm - Weight: 1080 g - Price (approx.): €4500/$4299

Fuji's new beginner line of fixed aperture cine lenses. (Review at nofilmschool)

 

 

 

 

Third Party (92 lenses in total) (only the Zeiss lenses have autofocus, all other are manual focus lenses)

Zeiss (3 lenses)

Touit 2.8/12 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 m - Magnification: 1:9 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 88 mm - Length: 68 mm - Weight: 270 g - Price (approx.): €850/$700

A lot more expensive than its direct competitor, the Samyang 12mm 2.0, which is even one full stop faster. The Samyang does not have autofocus, but at those short focal lengths, the depth of field is very large anyway, and Fujifilm cameras have focus peaking to aid manual focussing. (Reviews at The Luminous Landscape, PetaPixel, The Phoblographer)

 

Touit 1.8/32 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,37 m - Magnification: 1:9 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 58 mm - Weight: 210 g - Price (approx.): €600/$500

Some say it's as good as the XF 35mm 1.4, some say it is not. I guess the decision is up to personal preference. (Reviews at Paultography Blog, Admiring Light, Brian Smith (Sony))

 

Touit 2.8/50M product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: 1:1 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 91 mm - Weight: 290 g - Price (approx.): €900/$1000

The first macro lens for the X-Mount with a magnification of 1:1. When approaching living subjects like bugs, the focal length, and thus the close focus distance, might be too short. (Reviews at The Phoblographer, Tom Grill, Photo Madd, Passports & Lenses)

 

 

7Artisans (/DJ Optical) (6 lenses)

7.5mm f/2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,12 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 63 mm - Length: 63 mm - Weight: 275 g - Price (approx.): €140/$140

Manual focus fisheye.

 

12mm f/2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 62 mm - Length: 63 mm - Weight: 295 g - Price (approx.): €200/$190

Manual focus ultrawideangle lens.

 

25mm f/1.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 51 mm - Length: 32 mm - Weight: 143 g - Price (approx.): €70/$70

Manual focus wideangle lens.

 

35mm f/2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,35 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 43 mm - Diameter: 55 mm - Length: 60 mm - Weight: 300 g - Price (approx.): €160/$160

Manual focus normal lens.

 

35mm f/1.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 43 mm - Diameter: 51 mm - Length: 32 mm - Weight: 143 g - Price (approx.): €150/$145

Manual focus normal lens.

 

50mm f/1.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,35 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 14 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 55 mm - Diameter: 55 mm - Length: 53 mm - Weight: 272 g - Price (approx.): €95/$90

Manual focus short tele lens.

 

 

Duclos Lenses (5 lenses)

Veydra Mini Prime 19mm T2.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 90,4 mm - Weight: 500 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$1249

A set of real Cine Primes, all with similar body design and size. The Veydra lineup consists of seven lenses, 12, 16,19, 25, 35, 50 and 85mm in focal length, but only 19mm and up cover the super35 format and are available for Fujifilms X-Mount.

 

Veydra Mini Prime 25mm T2.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 90,4 mm - Weight: 508 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$1249

See above.

 

Veydra Mini Prime 35mm T2.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,28 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 90,4 mm - Weight: 521 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$1249

See above.

 

Veydra Mini Prime 50mm T2.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,38 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 90,4 mm - Weight: 544 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$1249

See above.

 

Veydra Mini Prime 85mm T2.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 80 mm - Length: 90,4 mm - Weight: 771 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$1249

See above.

 

 

Gizmon (1 lens)

Utulens 32 mm f/16 product page

Close Focus Distance: 1 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: none (fixed) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 15 mm - Weight: 46 g - Price (approx.): €35/$35

Fixed aperture, fixed focus body cap lens. "Sharp" from approximately 1 m to infinity. So far only available in Japan.

 

 

Jackar Optical (1 lens)

Snapshooter 34MM F1.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: 37 mm - Diameter: 53 mm - Length: 48 mm - Weight: 145 g - Price (approx.): €130/$130

Cheap, lightweight manual focus normal prime lens. The clickless aperture can be closed completely. (Review at The Phoblographer)

 

 

Kenko (1 lens)

400mm f/8.0 Mirror Lens product page

Close Focus Distance: 1,15 m - Magnification: 1:3 - Aperture Blades: fixed aperture - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 73,66 mm - Length: 81,28 mm - Weight: 340 g - Price (approx.): €250/$230

Mirror tele lens, similar to those sold by Samyang. Ring-shaped out of focus highlights, not very sharp.

 

 

Kipon (/HandeVision) (7 lenses)

Ibelux 40mm / 0.85 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,75 m - Magnification: 1:20 - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 74 mm - Length: 128 mm - Weight: 1150 g - Price (approx.): €1700/$1200

The fastest lens for the Fuji X-Mount, as well as the fastest CSC-Lens overall. Very long close focus distance, big, heavy, extremely expensive. A lot of purple fringing, and not extremely sharp. In short, not worth the money, but definitely something special. (Reviews at FujiRumors part 1 part 2, Admiring Light, Steve Huff, Matt Granger (youtube))

 

Ibelux 40mm / 0.85 Mark II

Close Focus Distance: 0,75 m - Magnification: 1:20 - Aperture Blades: 10 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 74 mm - Length: 128 mm - Weight: 1150 g - Price (approx.): €--/$--

An update to the fastest lens for the Fuji X-Mount. Supposed to be better corrected optically.

 

Iberit 24mm / 2.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 58 mm - Length: 68 mm - Weight: 320 g - Price (approx.): €620/$620

Manual wide angle prime lens.

 

Iberit 35mm / 2.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,35 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 58 mm - Length: 45 mm - Weight: 280 g - Price (approx.): €580/$580

Manual medium wide angle prime lens.

 

Iberit 50mm / 2.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,6 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 58 mm - Length: 65 mm - Weight: 310 g - Price (approx.): €550/$550

Manual medium telephoto prime lens.

 

Iberit 75mm / 2.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,6 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 58 mm - Length: 75 mm - Weight: 330 g - Price (approx.): €540/$540

Manual telephoto prime lens.

 

Iberit 90mm / 2.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,7 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 58 mm - Length: 79 mm - Weight: 340 g - Price (approx.): €490/$490

Manual telephoto prime lens.

 

 

Lensbaby (4 stand-alone lenses, 8 drop-in lenses for composer system)

Circular Fisheye 5.8mm f/3.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,1 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 70 mm - Length: 76 mm - Weight: 329 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$300

A circular fisheye lens with an angle of view of 185°. It throws a circular image onto the sensor plane of a full frame or APS-C camera, the rest of the image is black. The internal barrel is polished to create a ring of flare and reflection outside the image circle. (Reviews at Shutterbug, Micro 4/3rds Photography )

 

Burnside 35 f/2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 70 mm - Length: 67 mm - Weight: 374 g - Price (approx.): €--/$500

"Swirly Bokeh" lens with second aperture to control strenght of swirl effect and vignetting.

 

Velvet 56mm product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,13 m - Magnification: 1:2 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 72 mm - Length: 85 mm - Weight: 400 g - Price (approx.): €500/$500

"Classic" soft focus lens, with a classic portrait focal length. You really need to like the soft focus effect. Of course, you always could take a sharp picture with other lenses of this focal length and soften them afterwards. (Reviews at PetaPixel, Jake Hicks, Andrea Gulickx, Tyson Robichaud)

 

Velvet 85 f/1.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,24 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 76 mm - Length: 89 mm - Weight: 530 g - Price (approx.): €500/$500

Like the shorter Velvet 56, this is a soft focus lens.

 

Composer Pro with interchangeable optics product page

Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): € -- /$180

Tilt adapter for several lenses produced by Lensbaby. By moving the front part of the lens, you move the "focus point" (sweet optics) or "focus slice" (edge optics) across the frame, which will be the only part of the picture that is sharp, while everything else gets blurred. Of course, you could replicate most of those effects in post, but why bother when you can do it in camera. (Reviews at Fstoppers, The Phoblographer, FujiLove, photofocus, dpreview, SLR Lounge)

 

Composer Pro II with interchangeable optics product page

Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): € -- /$200

New version of the composer pro tilt adapter. It has a metal body and tilts 15° in every direction.

 

- Fisheye 12 f/4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,01 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: drop in aperture discs - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 49 mm - Length: 49 mm - Weight: 156 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$100

A circular fisheye lens with an angle of view of 160°. It throws a circular image onto the sensor plane of a full frame or APS-C camera, the rest of the image is black. The internal barrel is polished to create a ring of flare and reflection outside the image circle.

 

- Sweet 35 f/2.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,19 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 49 mm - Length: 48 mm - Weight: 139 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$180

Selective focus lens (extremely curved field of focus). By tilting the adapter, you move the "focus point" across the frame, which will be the only part of the picture that is sharp, while everything else gets blurred.

 

- Sweet 50 f/2.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,38 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 49 mm - Length: 43 mm - Weight: 102 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$120

Selective focus lens (extremely curved field of focus). By tilting the adapter, you move the "focus point" across the frame, which will be the only part of the picture that is sharp, while everything else gets blurred.

 

- Soft Focus 50 f/2.0 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: drop in aperture discs - Filter Thread: 37 mm - Diameter: 49 mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): € -- /$90

Soft focus lens with drop in aperture discs in three aperture sizes.

 

- Creative Aperture 50 f/2.0 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,46 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: drop in aperture discs - Filter Thread: 37 mm - Diameter: 49 mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 77 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$60

Instead of soft aperture discs, this lens has 12 discs with different shaped aperture openings and a curved field of focus to generate a "focus spot".

 

- Edge 50 f/3.2 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 48 mm - Length: 54 mm - Weight: 156 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$250

Selective focus lens (flat field of focus). By tilting the adapter, you generate a "focus slice" across the frame, which will be the only part of the picture that is sharp, while everything else gets blurred. When the lens is not tilted, it works like a usual lens.

 

- Twist 60 f/2.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,46 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 48 mm - Length: 56 mm - Weight: 128 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$180

This lens creates a swirly bokeh, known from petzval lenses. Lensbaby recommends to use this optic on full frame cameras, because crop cameras will cut away most of the swirly bokeh.

 

- Edge 80 f/2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,43 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 48 mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 200 g - Price (approx.): € -- /$300

Selective focus lens (flat field of focus). By tilting the adapter, you generate a "focus slice" across the frame, which will be the only part of the picture that is sharp, while everything else gets blurred. When the lens is not tilted, it works like a usual lens.

 

 

Meike (/Kaxinda /Opteka /Voking) (8 lenses)

MK-6.5mm-F/2.0 (fisheye) product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 61 mm - Length: 51,5 mm - Weight: 300 g - Price (approx.): €/$

A circular fisheye lens with an angle of view of 190°. It throws a circular image onto the sensor plane of a full frame or APS-C camera, the rest of the image is black. (Review at Christopher Frost Photography (Youtube))

 

MK-8mm-F/3.5 (fisheye) product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 77 mm - Length: 84 mm - Weight: 540 g - Price (approx.): €/$

Fisheye lens with an angle of view of 160°, made for full frame dslr cameras. Looks similar to the old Samyang 8/3.5.

 

MK-12mm-F/2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: 72 mm - Diameter: 78 mm - Length: 65,8 mm - Weight: 360 g - Price (approx.): €/$

Manual Focus wide-angle lens. Looks suspiciously similar to the Samyang 12/2, but has a slower aperture.

 

MK-E-25-0.95 (25mm F/0.95) product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,17 m - Magnification: 1:6.54 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 55 mm - Diameter: 64 mm - Length: 101 mm - Weight: 540 g - Price (approx.): €--/$500

The fastest wide-angle lens for the X-Mount.

 

MK-E-28-2.8 (28mm F/2.8) product page

Close Focus Distance: - Magnification: 1:9 - Aperture Blades: 9 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 60,4 mm - Length: 29 mm - Weight: 102 g - Price (approx.): €--/$100

A pancake sized manual focus normal lens for mirrorless APS-C systems.

 

MK-E-35-1.7 (35mm F/1.7) product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:8.85 - Aperture Blades: 9 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 60,5 mm - Length: 41 mm - Weight: 176 g - Price (approx.): €--/$100

Small manual focus normal lens for mirrorless APS-C systems. (Pictures at timkwowphoto, Sergio sg's flickr photostream)

 

MK-E-50-2.0 (50mm F/2.4?) product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: 1:12.5 - Aperture Blades: 9 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 60,5 mm - Length: 41 mm - Weight: 188 g - Price (approx.): €--/$100

Small manual focus short telephoto lens for mirrorless APS-C systems. The Meike-branded version is labelled f/2.0, while the similar looking Kaxinda-branded version is labelled f/2.4.

 

MK-E-85-2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 - Magnification: 1.5:1 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 55 mm - Diameter: 64 mm - Length: 117 mm - Weight: 500 g - Price (approx.): €300/$300

Manual focus short telephoto macro lens. (Review by Damian Brown (youtube))

 

 

Meyer Optik Görlitz (13 lenses)

Primagon 24 f2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 39 mm - Diameter: 62 mm - Length: 50 mm - Weight: 220 g - Price (approx.): €5000/$5100

Funded by their fourth kickstarter, this lens is supposed to start a new series of modern lenses, not based on old designs.

 

Lydith 30 f3.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,16 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: -- mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 220 g - Price (approx.): €1600/$1700

Compact manual focus wide-angle prime lens.

 

Trioplan F2,8 35 MM product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:4 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 39 mm - Diameter: 62 mm - Length: 50 mm - Weight: 220 g - Price (approx.): €1600/$1700

As well as the Trioplan 50 mm and 100 mm, this lens has the "soap bubble bokeh". But unlike the two bigger brothers, it's no 3 lens design. Instead, it will feature 5 lenses and is not based on a historic design. To be released at the end of 2017.

 

Nocturnus 35 f0.95 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 670 g - Price (approx.): €2000/$2300

Very fast normal lens.

 

Primotar X f2.8 50 mm product page

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: -- mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): €580/$700

Manual focus short tele prime.

 

Trioplan F2,9 50 MM product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 m - Magnification: 1:4 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 35,5 mm - Diameter: 62 mm - Length: 39 mm - Weight: 200 g - Price (approx.): €900/$1000

On April 14th, 2016, a kickstarter campaign has been launched to revive the classic Meyer-Optik-Görlitz Trioplan f2.9/50. The new version will have a classic triplet design, improved close focus distance and it will be overcorrected to produce the so called soap-bubble-bokeh. (To be released March 2017)

 

Nocturnus 50 f0.95 III product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,5 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 15 - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 830 g - Price (approx.): €3000/$3300

Very fast manual focus short telephoto prime lens.

 

Primoplan F1,9 58 MM product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,6 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 35,5 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 200 g - Price (approx.): €1300/$1400

The newest kickstarter project succeeded in 'reviving' the MOG Primoplan lens. To be released March 2017.

 

Primoplan 75 f1.9 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,75 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 14 - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 300 g - Price (approx.): €1999/$1999

MOG says this is their legendary portrait lens.

 

Somnium II 85 f1.5 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,85 - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 885 g - Price (approx.): €2000/$2000

Fast manual focus short telephoto prime lens with "swirly bokeh".

 

Trimagon 95 f2.6 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 15 - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): €1700/$1700

Telephoto portrait prime. The manufacturer says it has a special lens coating that reduces reflections of skin colors to replicate fine detail.

 

Trioplan 100 f2.8 product page

Close Focus Distance: 1 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 15 - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 800 g - Price (approx.): €1500/$1600

Soap-bubble-bokeh telephoto prime. Looks interesting, but I think I would not pay that much money for brighter rims in out-of-focus highlights.

 

APO-Makro-Plasmat 105 f2.7 product page

Close Focus Distance: 1,1 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 15 - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 350 g - Price (approx.): €2000/$2200

Manual focus telephoto prime macro lens.

 

 

Pixco (2 lenses)

7mm f/2.8

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: -- mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): €--/$--

tbd

 

60mm f/2.8

Close Focus Distance: -- m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: -- mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: -- g - Price (approx.): €--/$--

tbd

 

 

Machang Optics (/Sainsonic /Kamlan /Starblitz /Wesley /Zonlai) (5 lenses)

22mm F1.8 Zonlai

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 10 - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 55 mm - Length: 45 mm - Weight: 224 g - Price (approx.): €160/$160

Very cheap manual medium-wide-angle prime lens.

 

24mm F1.8 Wesley Macro MC

Close Focus Distance: 0,1 m (with reverse adapter) - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 33 mm - Weight: 151 g - Price (approx.): €90/$90

Very cheap manual medium-wide-angle prime lens. Aperture and focus ring are reversed compared to the "Zonlai" branded lenses. Package includes a reverse mount adapter that can be used for macro photography.

 

25mm F1.8 Discover / Movie HD

Close Focus Distance: 0,18 m - Magnification: 1:4 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 33 mm - Weight: 142 g - Price (approx.): €110/$120

Very cheap manual medium-wide-angle prime lens. (short Review at keh.vn via translate.google, pictures at ppchunn's flickr-album and redfishingboat's thread)

 

35mm F1.8 Discover

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: 1:8 - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 46 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 33 mm - Weight: 142 g - Price (approx.): €140/$120

Very cheap manual normal prime lens. (Review by Jonathan Hartmann (youtube))

 

55mm F1.1 Kamlan

Close Focus Distance: 0,5 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 60 mm - Weight: 248 g - Price (approx.): €170/$170

Very cheap manual short tele lens with very fast aperture. (Review by Alik Griffin)

 

 

Samyang (/Bower /Falcon /Opteka /Polar /Pro-Optic /Rokinon /Vivitar /Walimex) (20 lenses)

8mm F2.8 UMC Fish-eye II & 8mm T3.1 Cine UMC Fish-eye II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 60 mm - Length: 65 mm - Weight: 290 g - Price (approx.): €380/$300

The go-to fisheye lens for the X-Mount. Small, light, fast, a true mirrorless APS-C design, and not very expensive. (Reviews at lonelyspeck, Admiring Light, Eyes Unclouded)

 

8mm F3.5 UMC Fish-eye CS II & 8mm T3.8 VDSLR UMC Fish-eye CS II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 75 mm - Length: 77,3 mm - Weight: 440 g - Price (approx.): €380/$200

Big, heavy DSLR lens that was adapted to the X-Mount, version II. The 8mm F2.8 UMC Fish-eye II looks much more promising. (Reviews at Photo Review, Lenstip)

 

10mm F2.8 ED AS NCS CS & 10mm T3.1 VDSLR ED AS NCS CS II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 / 0,24 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 86 mm - Length: 106 mm - Weight: 625 g - Price (approx.): €400/$360

Big and heavy converted full frame DSLR lens. (Review at ephotozine)

 

12mm F2.0 NCS CS & 12mm T2.2 Cine NCS CS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 73 mm - Length: 59 mm - Weight: 260 g - Price (approx.): €380/$320

Wonderful manual wide angle lens for the X-System, and a true mirrorless APS-C design. Good for astrophotography, too. (Reviews at lonelyspeck, lenstip, Davin Lavikka (Youtube))

 

12mm F2.8 ED AS NCS Fish-eye & 12mm T3.1 VDSLR ED AS NCS Fish-eye product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 77,3 mm - Length: 99 mm - Weight: 565 g - Price (approx.): €550/$--

Big adapted full frame DSLR lens. When looking for a fisheye,it should be considered to go really wide and have the 8mm, which is smaller, lighter and cheaper. (Review at SLR Lounge, pictures at cameralabs)

 

12mm f/7.4 RMC Fisheye manufactured by Toda Seiko

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: none (fixed) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 65 mm - Length: 57,4 mm - Weight: 220 g - Price (approx.): €--/$130

Fixed aperture, fixed focus. The manufacturer Toda Seiko is known for wide-angle and macro adapters for compact cameras and smartphones. (Information at Imaging Resource)

 

14mm F2.8 ED AS IF UMC & 14mm T3.1 VDSLR ED AS IF UMC II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,28 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 87 mm - Length: 96,1 mm - Weight: 620 g - Price (approx.): €400/$290

The XF 14mm F2.8 R is smaller, lighter and has autofocus, but it is more expensive than this adapted full frame DSLR lens. (Reviews at lonelyspeck, Alik Griffin)

 

16mm F2.0 ED AS UMC CS & 16mm T2.2 VDSRL ED AS UMC CS II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 8 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 83 mm - Length: 89,4 mm - Weight: 583 g - Price (approx.): €400/$330

With the release of the XF 16mm F1.4 R WR this one seems to be less interesting, but it is still a cheaper manual focus lens, though bigger and heavier, due to being an adapted full frame DSLR lens. (Reviews at dxomark, ephotozine)

 

20mm F1.8 ED AS UMC & 20mm T1.9 ED AS UMC product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 7 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 - Diameter: 83 mm - Length: 114,7 mm - Weight: 565 g - Price (approx.): €500/$500

A fast manual focus wideangle lens, designed for full frame cameras. (reviews at Gippsland Images and ephotozine)

 

21mm F1.4 ED AS UMC CS & 21mm T1.5 ED AS UMC CS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,28 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 58 mm - Diameter: 64,3 mm - Length: 67,9 mm - Weight: 290 g - Price (approx.): €/$500

Medium wide angle lens, designed for mirrorless APS-C systems. (reviews at ephotozine, Photography Blog)

 

24mm F1.4 ED AS IF UMC & 24mm T1.5 VDSLR ED AS IF UMC II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,25 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 8 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 83 mm - Length: 97,5 mm - Weight: 610 g - Price (approx.): €600/$450

The XF 23mm F/1.4 R, while not that much more expensive, is even smaller and lighter than this adapted full frame DSLR lens, despite having autofocus. (Reviews at lonely speck, ephotozine)

 

T-S 24mm F3.5 ED AS UMC product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,2 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 6 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 82 mm - Diameter: 86 mm - Length: 136 mm - Weight: 745 g - Price (approx.): €1000/$0

The only tilt-shift-lens for the X-Mount. If you need one, you either need to buy this one, or adapt a DSLR lens. (Reviews at Northlight Images, Dustin Abbott)

 

35mm F1.4 AS UMC & 35mm T1.5 VDSLR AS UMC II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 8 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 83 mm - Length: 110 mm - Weight: 716 g - Price (approx.): €380/$410

Big, heavy full frame DSLR lens that was adapted to the X-Mount, as many other within the Samyang Lineup. The Fuji X-System has more interesting alternatives, the XF 35mm F1.4 R, the XF 35mm F2.0 R WR and the Zeiss Touit 1.8/32, all of them smaller, lighter and offering autofocus. (Reviews at Fstoppers, Steven Oakley)

 

35mm F1.2 ED AS UMC CS & 35mm T1.3 AS UMC CS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,38 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 - Diameter: 67,5 mm - Length: 74,5 mm - Weight: 433 g - Price (approx.): €420/$450

A fast manual focus normal lens, designed for mirrorless cameras.

 

50mm F1.2 AS UMC CS & 50mm T1.3 AS UMC CS product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,5 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 67,5 mm - Length: 74,5 mm - Weight: 380 g - Price (approx.): €/$550

Fast but short portrait lens, designed for mirrorless APS-C systems. As to be expected, not very sharp wide open, and some chromatic abberations. (Review at Photography Blog)

 

50mm F1.4 AS IF UMC & 50mm T1.5 VDSLR AS UMC product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,45 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 8 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 82 mm - Length: 101 mm - Weight: 640 g - Price (approx.): €520/$--

Optically very good except for distortion. Big plus is sharpness wide open, but large and heavy because it is an adapted full frame DSLR lens. (Review at cinema5D, SLR Lounge)

 

85mm F1.4 AS IF UMC & 85mm T1.5 VDSLR AS IF UMC II product page

Close Focus Distance: 1 & 1.1 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 8 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 72 mm - Diameter: 78 mm - Length: 101 mm - Weight: 610 g - Price (approx.): €350/$270

Seems to be a cheap, fast medium telephoto lens. Not as sharp as the XF 90mm F2.0 R LM WR wide open. Adapted full frame DSLR lens, but this has less impact in size and weight with longer focal lengths. (Reviews at cameralabs, Bob Atkins, pictures at Donald Falls' flickr photo stream)

 

100mm F2.8 ED UMC Macro & 100mm T3.1 VDSLR ED UMC Macro product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,31 m - Magnification: 1:1 - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 67 mm - Diameter: 72,5 mm - Length: 149,4 mm - Weight: 770 g - Price (approx.): €530/$550

True 1:1 macro lens for the X-Mount. Pictures shown so far look very promising, but with the XF 80mm 2.8 in the pipeline, it should be considered to wait for that one and have a fast telephoto lens with autofocus. Adapted full frame DSLR lens, but this has less impact in size and weight with longer focal lengths. (Review at ephotozine and pictures at Transcontinenta BV's flickr photo stream)

 

135mm F2.0 ED UMC & 135mm T2.2 VDSLR ED UMC product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,8 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 (rounded) - Filter Thread: 77 mm - Diameter: 82 mm - Length: 120 mm - Weight: 880 g - Price (approx.): €550/$550

Huge full frame DSLR lens, adapted to the X-Mount. Excellent image quality. A smaller alternative with autofocus and weather sealing is the XF 90mm F2.0 R LM WR. The XF 50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR, though not smaller or lighter, also adds autofocus, weathersealing, image stabilization and the flexibility of a zoom. (Reviews at Dustin Abbott, PC Mag, Dark Shape, pictures at photography blog)

 

300mm f/6.3 ED UMC CS Reflex product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,9 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: none (fixed) - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 64,5 mm - Length: 74 mm - Weight: 316 g - Price (approx.): €240/$260

It's a long telephoto, but it's also a reflex design. And the (fixed) aperture is a bit slow. Pictures don't look sharp and show a lot of CA. It has very special ring-shaped out of focus highlights which are inherent to the design of reflex lenses. (Reviews at The Phoblographer, macfilos (compared with adapted tokina 400mm), pictures at dp review)

 

 

SLR Magic (3 lenses)

23mm f/1.7 Hyperprime product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: 61,3 mm - Weight: 265 g - Price (approx.): €--/$400

Small manual focus medium-wide-angle prime lens.

 

35mm T f/1.4 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,3 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: - Filter Thread: 52 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: 70,3 mm - Weight: 390 g - Price (approx.): €--/$350

Small manual focus normal prime lens. For a bit more money, the Fujinon XF 35mm F2.0 R WR and the Fujinon XF 35mm F1.4 R offer autofocus.

 

Noktor 50mm f/0.95 HyperPrime product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: -- mm - Length: -- mm - Weight: 490 g - Price (approx.): €--/$950

Very fast manual focus short telephoto prime lens, very expensive.

 

 

Venus Optics (1 lens)

Laowa 60mm f/2.8 2X Ultra-Macro product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,185 m - Magnification: 2:1 - Aperture Blades: 14 - Filter Thread: 62 mm - Diameter: 70 mm - Length: 95 mm - Weight: 694 g - Price (approx.): €400/$400

Currently the highest magnifying macro lens for the Fuji X-Mount.

 

 

Yasuhara (1 lens)

Madoka 180 (7.3mm f/4) product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: -- - Filter Thread: none - Diameter: 61 mm - Length: 43 mm - Weight: 173 g - Price (approx.): €240/$240

As the name implies, a 180° fisheye lens, which throws a circular image onto the sensor plane.

 

 

Zhongyi (3 lenses)

Mitakon Creator 20mm f/2.0 product page

Close Focus Distance: -- - Magnification: 4 - 4.5 - Aperture Blades: 3 - Filter Thread: -- - Diameter: 62 mm - Length: 60 mm - Weight: 230 g - Price (approx.): €--/$200

An inverted wide-angle design creates a pure macro lens with magnifications between 4 and 4.5. Can therefore not focus to infinity.

 

Mitakon Freewalker 24mm f/1.7 product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,15 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 12 - Filter Thread: 49 mm - Diameter: 61,5 mm - Length: 55 mm - Weight: 246 g - Price (approx.): €--/$350

Shows chromatic aberations and reduced sharpness in the corners, otherwise a good manual focus medium wide angle lens. Aperture ring without clicks.(Review at ephotozine, Simons Photography Blog)

 

Mitakon Speedmaster 35mm f/0.95 II product page

Close Focus Distance: 0,35 m - Magnification: -- - Aperture Blades: 9 - Filter Thread: 55 mm - Diameter: 63 mm - Length: 60 mm - Weight: 460 g - Price (approx.): €600/$600

Zhongyi promises a 30% increase in resolution and lower CA while reducing weight and size of the lens compared to the predecessor by using one extra-low dispersion, two extra-high refractive and three high refractive elements. (Review at dc.watch.impress.co.jp via translate.google, images at yukosteel's thread)

 

 

 

Lens Chart

 

post-6232-0-57755500-1523217236_thumb.png

The lenses' maximum aperture plottet over their focal length and the resulting diagonal angle of view. The scale is double logarithmic.

Please note that the denoted angle of view is only valid for rectilinear lenses, fisheye lenses have a wider angle of view at the same focal length, which is inherent to their design.

 

-

 

 

Lens Chart (Cine Lenses)

 

post-6232-0-45366500-1523217252_thumb.png

The lenses' transmittivity plottet over their focal length.

 

-

Edited by quincy

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very nice, I particularly appreciated the factual part of the list while I have some reservations on the “ comments” some of which are clearly based on hearsay or a debatable opinion ( there are other opinions out there opposed to the quoted ones).

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I own the 56 APD, and as you comment, it's a nice one to have just for the uniqueness. I don't miss the loss of light at all, but the bokeh is stupendous. If I could only have one lens, this would be it. I've seen some go second hand for same price as a new normal 56, so well worth a shot. Mine did have to be serviced twice though, first the autofocus motor died, then optical assembly was horribly unsharp. Now it's crazy sharp, so watch out when you get a second hand one without testing it.

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One thing strikes me and I have been thinking about this for a while.

 

I read many comments about faulty fuji lenses ( i suppose that other brands have that kind of problem too, I don’t partake to other sites ), yet the Fuji lens assembly looks first class. I wonder if we just know more about problems due  to internet exposing these things or if standards have fallen because from the ’70 to the late ’90 I don’t remember having ever heard of so many problems.

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if standards have fallen because from the ’70 to the late ’90 I don’t remember having ever heard of so many problems.

 

How many AF lenses you had in the 70s? How many rolls of film that was capable of producing 300+ frames you had in the late 90s?

 

We're shooting too much.

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From the second half of the '80 onwards there were many AF cameras and electric lenses and yes we shot less but there were many more cameras around that there are now and it seems to me that there were less complaints, but I can’t say for sure.

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One thing strikes me and I have been thinking about this for a while.

 

I read many comments about faulty fuji lenses ( i suppose that other brands have that kind of problem too, I don’t partake to other sites ), yet the Fuji lens assembly looks first class. I wonder if we just know more about problems due  to internet exposing these things or if standards have fallen because from the ’70 to the late ’90 I don’t remember having ever heard of so many problems.

 

 

 

You hear more about problems than about succes stories. In other words: Look at the local news... it's filled with "disasters, crime, traffic jams, etc." but hardly with positive news. 

 

Kudos to the TS for his post! Wish there was more information about the 100-400 though, but we have to be patient I guess...

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Very nice work - a fine reference for the community. Thank you!

 

 

One thing strikes me and I have been thinking about this for a while.

 

....I don’t remember having ever heard of so many problems.

 

 

No internet back then. No electronics in what were solid brass (or aluminum) and glass lenses. Film did not show lens flaws like a 36mp digital sensor. But mostly the first thing.

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I understand the lack of internet and in fact I did mention that that was a possible factor in determining my perception but I was into quite a network of pro-photographers and worked at trade fairs ( with tens of thousands of visitors) for both Pentax and Nikon and yet never heard too many complaints.

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This was originally part of the first posting, but I moved it here for better readability:

This weekend, I took some time to sit down and think about the future of my Fuji system. Looking through my highest rated shots, I realized that some things I try to shoot just don’t work out the way I’d like, and don’t show up with the 4- or 5-star pics. While I’m perfectly happy with every single piece of my current kit* when used for the intended purpose, it seems that I probably need a new lens or two.

*Short explanation: Wanted to buy just the X-T1 and the XF 55-200, and a fast prime later on. Ended up buying the X-T1 + XF 18-55 kit as a demo sample in a shop for a price less than a new body alone, which prevented me from buying a fast prime so far. The XF 18-55 does just everything except extreme bokeh. But for bokeh, I can use the incredible 55-200.

And as always before buying new stuff I dug deep into the specs, numbers and reviews and tried to find an overview of the options available. Since I haven’t found one, I tried to collect a complete list of all lenses (available and upcoming) for the Fuji X-Mount myself. And that’s what I’ve come up with:

 

[...]

 

As you can see, I’m not completely sure about every lens. But perhaps that’s where you can help.

I’ve also made a chart, plotting the lenses’ maximum aperture over the focal length. The focal length scale is logarithmic to show the prime area more prominent. The aperture scale is now logarithmic too, to provide equal intervals between full aperture stops.

 

[...]

 

I’m not sure if the aperture curves for the zoom lenses are correct. However, I had a look at what aperture my own two zoom lenses have depending on the focal length, and fitted a formula to compute the aperture curve. I then used that formula for the other lenses too. When comparing your own lenses, consider that the aperture shown on your camera is a rounded value, and probably jumps to the higher value before really reaching it when increasing the focal length, and vice versa for decreasing the focal length.

 

 

- added a bunch of previously missed lenses to the OP that seem to be not available in Europe

- adapted prices for Europe, since the Fuji summer rebates are over

- added approx. prices for US (Is it enough to compare Adorama, BH Photo & Amazon prices to get accurate pricing? I know a lot of european photo stores, online&offline, but no american ones)

- refreshed the diagram

- some cosmetic changes, spaces etc.

 

 

Thank you all for the positive reception!

Does anyone know if and how the width of the graphic can be adjusted automatically?

 

 

I have some reservations on the “ comments” some of which are clearly based on hearsay or a debatable opinion ( there are other opinions out there opposed to the quoted ones).

I know, and I've never tried to hide that fact. The comments are exactly the part I'd like to improve on the most. Just tell me what you don't like and why. Can't hurt my feelings, I'm an engineer.

 

I will be happy to share it on FujiRumors ;)

Didn't expect that, would make me happy. But are you sure it's already good enough to be shared? As stated previously, there's a lot to be improved.

 

Thanks, added to the OP.

 

@Tom H.: Thanks, input appreciated very much!

 

Wish there was more information about the 100-400 though, but we have to be patient I guess...

I'm no magician, I'm afraid. And I'd like to know more too. But I'll have that lens the day it is available, if it's bright enough (5.6) at the long end. Don't care about the short end, and would prefer a fixed aperture lens, for the marked aperture ring.

 

 

About the Film debate, I think I can contribute to that one.

short background info: I started shooting film when I was about 8 years old (cheap rangefinder -> Canon AE-1 Program -> Canon T70) and did so until the late teenage years, when digital was already wide available. Went on to digital point an shoot out of convenience (Panasonic TZ-3, Sony RX100), and am now back to bigger cameras with the X-T1.

Quite a long time, most lenses were manual. I myself do not own a single AF-lens for my film cameras. The manual lenses, without any electronic parts, have proven to be nearly indestructible due to their simple mechanical design, as Max_Elmar pointed out. The AF-lenses for the Canon FD mout were hideous giant bulky beasts with the AF-stuff growing out of the side. After Canon finally switched to the EOS system with the EF mount in '87, I remember some negativity relating to the reliability of the lenses, but not much. On the Nikon side, I've never heard anything bad. Perhaps because the lenses were still mostly pure mechanical designs, with the AF motor in the camera body.

So I guess there were less problems in the film era. But on the other side, I really think that most problems that are easy identifiable today would have gone unnoticed in the film era. The common user would not shoot 30 pictures of the same thing, and thus would not see that the lens is, for example, decentered/tilted. And even if the defect would theoretically be there on every picture, you probably would not have seen it because of the way we looked at our analog pictures at that time. Projectors and (silver) screens gave huge pictures to look at, but none of those I have seen were anything close to what we would call "sharp" today. And the standard size prints would not have revealed most of those problems, too. Today, everyone can look 1:1 into those 24 MP files on 27" 2K or 4K screens, and right away share his/her findings with the whole world..

 

Oh, and by the way, I'm no native english speaker, and I've never liked languages that much, so please pardon my inevitable orthographic and grammatical mistakes.

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 Didn't expect that, would make me happy. But are you sure it's already good enough to be shared? As stated previously, there's a lot to be improved.

To me this is a very good work already. But if you need time to perfect it, it's absolutely fine to wait.

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Thank you all for the positive reception!

Does anyone know if and how the width of the graphic can be adjusted automatically?

 

You are using Firefox, right?

Known issue, I will fix it later today...

 

Andreas

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Well, where you comment on the 12mm Samyang being not sharp at the edges at full aperture you are openly reporting someone else’s opinion and not your own findings  and that opinion is not even a common one among the many users and reviewers of this lens. However you don’t mention that the Zeiss 12mm has very similar resolution under the same circumstances but you correctly identify that it has the advantage of autofocus but at an incredible price for this against a similar performance.

 

Another thing that you mention is that the 50-230mm due to its aperture would be a full sunshine only lens. Granted it is not the most light efficient lens but given the fact that I have shot great shots with Fuji cameras up to 3200 ISO , this lens is perfectly capable to go into relative darkness and in any case at only a very minor disadvantage compared to the way more expensive 55-200. In a thread that I have opened on this lens many report having been discouraged from buying it from comments like yours, while the many USERS of this lens show more than decent shots.

 

I don’t use long focal lenses much and that’s why I bought this lens but I have been marveling at its quality ever since. In fact I am now selling mine to a friend and buying another ( in a kit where this lens practically comes for free!).

 

The 60mm macro shows a 1:2  reproduction ratio, this was not at all uncommon for many macro lenses in the film days and they came with rings to expand to 1:1 or more. Exactly like the 60mm does.

 

On lens quality.

 

The second lens that I bought was a 10-24 mm at the time one of the most expensive lenses in the system.

 

It came out from a never opened package with some black spec inside the lens sitting on the inside of the first rear element plus a few more smaller bits inside only visible with a magnifier.

 

I was horrified and I went back to the shop and they gave me another one, no problem, but I have heard of so many of these stories afterwards that this was by no means a freak occurrence ( also about Samyang) and that includes also lenses (especially wideangles) with misalignment of some element showing a definite loss of sharpness on one side only of the frame.

 

This I find particularly disturbing. Especially when it comes to buying a secondhand lens or one ordered overseas!

 

 

Yet the video of the Fuji assembly line shows a spotless and very high quality ( the Samyang assembly line is nowhere near that perfect) operation. If that is the case specs in a new lens can only come from parts inside the lens wearing out after they have assembled it and they test the lenses ( but don’t look into them before putting into the box?).

 

In the olden days ( even when lenses were already autofocus and had electric and electronic parts) I can’t remember hearing so many complaints. I understand that the internet makes this information more readily available but, as I said before, at that time I worked as a camera demonstrator and even as chief demonstrator, managing an entire crew of demonstrators, at trade fairs for Pentax and Nikon.

 

I’ve heard all sorts of complaints and suggestions ( those drove me crazy, now we read them on line, people living in a fantasy world thinking that a lens which has been studied and developed of several years before finding production could be tweaked if only I communicated to Mr. Nikon or Mr. Pentax their wishes!) but never of the nature that I am reading, for example here on this forum.

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I have the Samyang 85mm 1.4.

 

It is a decent quality lens specially for it's price. It's obviously made for portrait and it works good IF you like the soft look. This is not an ultra sharp lens. But for specifically getting soft results, it is quite good. I don't regret buying it, cause i know there are situations i really like to use it, but to be honest it's use is quite limited. Now that the 90mm F2 fuji lens is out, i would not buy it, cause i get the soft results in post production if i really want to, and i'd have the sharpness that the samyang 85 simply can't get. 

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First: I hit some kind of barrier while searching for more information. Does anyone know more about the magnification of the samyang lenses? I could easily calculate (idealized) the magnification from the close focus distance and the focal lenght, but the problem with this is, that the results will probably be quite off because of the focus breathing most lenses have.

I will soon proceed to add more one to two sentence - conclusions to several lenses, as soon as I myself am sure about what to think about them. Most will of course be based on the consensus of reviews found across the internet. My long term goal will be to add two or three links per lens to reviews I think are informative and fair. Is there anything (forum rules, personal aversion) that speaks against that?
 
 

To me this is a very good work already. But if you need time to perfect it, it's absolutely fine to wait.

I feel honoured about that. Feel free to share this thread whenever you want, if you still want to. Perhaps, if more people see the thread, more people contribute to the collection of data.
 

 

You are using Firefox, right? [...]

Should work now! [...]

Right, it's the Firefox. Whatever you did, it worked. Thank you very much!
 

 

Well, where you comment on the 12mm Samyang being not sharp at the edges at full aperture you are openly reporting someone else’s opinion and not your own findings and that opinion is not even a common one among the many users and reviewers of this lens. However you don’t mention that the Zeiss 12mm has very similar resolution under the same circumstances but you correctly identify that it has the advantage of autofocus but at an incredible price for this against a similar performance.

I supposed it would be this one and the 50-230 where we collide. But one after the other. I guess what I wrote about this lens looks a bit confusing. What I was trying to say was, everything I have read about this lens was very positive, except that one example. And I wanted to link that one example, so everyone can draw own conclusions. Actually, the Samyang 12mm 2.0 is one of the few lenses I strongly consider to buy in the near future (for landscape, astro stuff and cramped interiors), so I already hold it in high esteem. I will rephrase the comment on that lens in the near future.
And let us be fair, regarding reporting someone else's opinion: I never said "I tested each lens available for the X-Mount and this is what I found out", I said I made a list because I want to expand my lens collection. So, most of the comments I write will be based on reviews.
 

Another thing that you mention is that the 50-230mm due to its aperture would be a full sunshine only lens. Granted it is not the most light efficient lens but given the fact that I have shot great shots with Fuji cameras up to 3200 ISO , this lens is perfectly capable to go into relative darkness and in any case at only a very minor disadvantage compared to the way more expensive 55-200. In a thread that I have opened on this lens many report having been discouraged from buying it from comments like yours, while the many USERS of this lens show more than decent shots.

I don’t use long focal lenses much and that’s why I bought this lens but I have been marveling at its quality ever since. In fact I am now selling mine to a friend and buying another ( in a kit where this lens practically comes for free!).

While I think we do agree on the Samyang 12 2.0, this one will get difficult. Unlike you, most stuff i shoot is at the long end. To be precise, about 70% of my keepers are shot with the XF55-200, and a bit more than 75% of those are shot at 200mm. Thus, I'm a bit more critical about that lens. I have never critcised the image quality of the 50-230. All I have seen was acceptable, and the lens is for sure great for people who don't use long focal lenghts often. The price is a steal. But the 55-200 is not that much more expensive, especially with the 50-140 in mind.

Anyway, the aperture is where we probably will not be able to agree. Even if we say we compare them both at 200mm, because the 55-200 can't go to 230, the 50-230 is at that focal lenght at approximately f/6.5. That's one stop less light, which means doubling the ISO. Since I frequently have situations where I already need to go to ISO 1000 or 1250 with the 55-200, the 50-230 would need to go way beyond ISO 1600, where I've set my personal limit. Above that, the image quality just degrades too much for me, especially if you need to crop. You can't see detail in the hair/fur/feathers of wildlife, and for eyes it's often too much grain to really "pop". Getting the ISO down by using a lower shutter speed (below 1/300th - 1/500th) and relying upon the OIS does not work with moving subjects. All in all, the 50-230 just is not for me. And that is not because it's "only a XC lens", but because it does not what I needed it to do. And the 55-200 does. I guess "sunshine only lens" is a bit harsh, and it depends on what one uses the lens for. but if you want shutter speeds faster than 1/300th closer to 1/500th, an aperture of 4.8 will get you to high ISOs long before sunset. And 6.7 doubles that ISO.

 

The 60mm macro shows a 1:2 reproduction ratio, this was not at all uncommon for many macro lenses in the film days and they came with rings to expand to 1:1 or more. Exactly like the 60mm does.

I didn't say - and never wanted to imply - that this lens is anything but good (optically). But focal lenghts below 180mm (35mm equivalent) are simply not useful for what I want to do. If someone take pictures of flowers, does product photography or anything else where the subject does not try to run away when you get too close, this lens might be all one ever needs. And for most use cases, 1:2 is enough. But not for me, and that's why I hardly can wait until the XF 120mm Macro gets released (or until I can try to screw a giant achromatic closeup lens onto the 100-400). I guess I need to rephrase that one too.
 

On lens quality. [...]

Sorry to hear about your 10-24. As long as we can quickly get working replacement for the flawed lenses, I guess it's acceptable. And overall, the lens quality is what made Fujifilm so successful in only a few years. But perhaps the high demand was too much for their production line, and when they needed to speed up production, somehow the QA was left behind?
 

 

...or so they think... ;) ( not a reference to OP, just making fun really! :D)

Don't know about others, but I'm just like a mindless bot, collecting data. (and happy with that)
 

 

I have the Samyang 85mm 1.4.

It is a decent quality lens specially for it's price. It's obviously made for portrait and it works good IF you like the soft look. This is not an ultra sharp lens. But for specifically getting soft results, it is quite good. I don't regret buying it, cause i know there are situations i really like to use it, but to be honest it's use is quite limited. Now that the 90mm F2 fuji lens is out, i would not buy it, cause i get the soft results in post production if i really want to, and i'd have the sharpness that the samyang 85 simply can't get.

Thank you very much for your input! Just a question before I add that to the OP: Is the lens always soft, or does it get sharp when stopped down? And if it gets sharp, at what aperture? The comparison with the XF 90mm 2.0 suggests itself because of the quite similar size, weight and focal lenght, but the one whole stop brighter aperture (Samyang) could make a difference, as well as the autofocus (Fujinon). And while the Samyang is a lot cheaper, the XF 90mm 2.0 seems to be optically superior. So I guess, both lenses might have their audience within the X-System.

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thanks for the clarifications but again, many of your statements are, as you yourself say, based on you particular needs ( the frequent use of “ for me” in your explanation shows that you are aware of that)  that is therefore not an universally applicable criterium, or your likes and dislikes, often times not based on direct experience but on someone else’s report.

 

This is what these days is often found on the internet articles quoting other articles which often are based on other articles. Nothing wrong with that as long as one clearly says that what you are quoting is someone else’s opinion which you might very well share, but that you have no direct experience on.

 

The list you made, commendable and useful though it is, might arise in some readers the idea that it was all based on factual, objective and direct experience collected by you personally and that, isn’t always the case.

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