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long travel combo advice - xt10 or xt1?


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hi fellas,

 

my first post here, yet've been here on multiple occassions. 

 

Im about to embark on almost two years bike trip in australia/asia, hence looking for light and solid mirrorless system.

basically i was all in for xt1, but the xt10 came and pretty much made some shifts in my mind.

 

my budget is not that big - quite around 2000 gbp - around 3100 usd.

 

opt 1:

 

xt1 with 18-135

 

35 1.4

 

samyang 12 mm 2.0

 

opt 2:

 

xt10 18-55 and 55 - 200

 

35 1.4

 

samyang 12 mm 2.0

 

yes, the weather sealing in xt1 is quite the big deal for my needs - i expect going through monsoon months in asia, than chilly winter in middle east. yet, the reports from older fuji cameras (especially xe2) talks much about how tough are this cameras, even without WR.

 

and the better focal range, as well as aperature points to xt10.

 

can you give me any recomendations?

 

BTW: i posted similar question on dpreview, however the response tended to go away from my concern, as i am fully devoted to use fuji system (many bikepacking, traveling lads made my mind about fuji), so i guess it would be better to ask it here ;) 

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For a trip like that I would call weather sealing a requirement. Don't trust it shooting in the middle of a monsoon, but call it a required insurance policy. I would also say versatility is absolutely key for every choice you make. So to kick things off, the X-T1 with the 18-135mm WR lens is where you start and build from there. I feel like maybe I hit the image stabilization in every post I make involving lenses, but the stabilization in that lens is outstanding. If you are doing anything physically exerting and stopping to take photos, that stabilization will bail you out big time.

 

I would also say that a good bag is going to be a must have. For a kit this size, perhaps a Billingham L2 ($219US).

 

At current B&H prices in the US, that puts you at $1719US.

 

So where you go next is partly up to your preferences. I would strongly consider adding the 27mm for street shooting since it takes up almost no weight or space for $350US. That's going to put you at just under $2100US. From here, you could add the 35mm ($449)US or the 23mm ($749US) and still have just enough space in your budget to squeeze in the Samyang 12mm even with the more expensive 23mm. Making the choice between the 2 fast primes would just be your preference for how wide you like to shoot.

 

I don't think you can go wrong with these choices, but my 3 points are: I would not go without the weather sealing. Include the cost of a really, really good bag in your budget that also doesn't scream CAMERA! Don't rule out the 27mm as a street shooter.

 

One last option for maximum versatility but no fast prime would be the 10-24mm instead of the 23 or 35.

Edited by Nero
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I truly love lenses.  If I get paid, I go down the road to B&H and buy something.  But I also travel a long trips.  After the first month, you're ready to ditch everything.  I have the XT-1, XE-2, and the cute little X-100s.  I think you should take the XT-1, the 18-135 and the 27 pancake lens.  You can shoot everything with those 2.  I recommend the pancake because it receives less attention than a big lens.  I've been in places where the people glower so much that I keep the camera around my shoulder.  And they stare at long lenses in a greedy way.  The pancake causes less attention. 

 

That said, the 10-24 is lovely.  Great for inside places that are tight.  Temples and interiors show up well.

 

As for a bag, get something that is waterproof and looks cheap.

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hi fellas,
 
my first post here, yet've been here on multiple occassions. 
 
Im about to embark on almost two years bike trip in australia/asia, hence looking for light and solid mirrorless system.
basically i was all in for xt1, but the xt10 came and pretty much made some shifts in my mind.
 
my budget is not that big - quite around 2000 gbp - around 3100 usd.
 
opt 1:
 
xt1 with 18-135
 
35 1.4
 
samyang 12 mm 2.0
 
opt 2:
 
xt10 18-55 and 55 - 200
 
35 1.4
 
samyang 12 mm 2.0
 
yes, the weather sealing in xt1 is quite the big deal for my needs - i expect going through monsoon months in asia, than chilly winter in middle east. yet, the reports from older fuji cameras (especially xe2) talks much about how tough are this cameras, even without WR.
 
and the better focal range, as well as aperature points to xt10.
 
can you give me any recomendations?
 
BTW: i posted similar question on dpreview, however the response tended to go away from my concern, as i am fully devoted to use fuji system (many bikepacking, traveling lads made my mind about fuji), so i guess it would be better to ask it here ;)

 

Personally I'd choose 18-135. The only reason to take 55-200 is that if you shoot at 200mm a lot. All shorter focal length could be just cropped from 135mm with marginal quality reduction. Otherwise you'll meet a situation where there is no time to switch from 18-55 to 55-200 or back. WR is also a big advantage in dusty countries. 55-200 is an air pump that pushes all the small dust onto the sensor. 18-135 is also much lighter than 18-55 + 55-200

Talking about cameras it's totally up to your preferences and your wallet. I would not say that body weather sealing is a game changer. I'd recommend to consider ergonomics and EVF size in contrast to very serious price addition. PDAF is also important for tracking if you need it.

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If I were to undertake such a trip I would first of all have at least two bodies with me, so, maybe there will be the need for both the X-T1 AND the X-T10!

 

On the X-T1 I would put ( and leave there without ever changing the lens to render the possibility of dust on the sensor as remote as possible) a weather sealed 18-135 and use it for 90% of the shots while on the road.

 

Dust, wind and rain won’t be of any concern with this camera and lens.

 

The X-10 will come out its Pelikan case ( a must if you really are going through humid or dusty environment and don’t forget the silica gel )  when I want to do something that is not putting my camera at the real risk to be damaged for the rest of the trip and for which I need a lens offering some special features that the zoom isn’t providing.

 

12, 35 and 56 are a good idea but there might be many more possibilities all depending on what you intend to shoot. I don’t normally use long lenses and at the moment the choice is rather poor in this department but if you need a long lens I’d rather take the cheap, light and longer 50-230 despite being not as light efficient you will find that the lens performs very well indeed. You need a tripod for all manners of shots.

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I recently spent a full day in near freezing rain with my then month old X-T1 and 16-55 f2.8. Weather proofing is excellent and for what your proposing I'd highly recommend the T1 and a WR lens for this reason alone.

 

The 16-55 is a lovely lens though on the heavy side but suites me as it is the equivalent of my go to 24-70 Nikon. I won't recommend a specific lens as that's your choice, just get it from weather sealed lineup.

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You'll need to give us a bit more information about what and how you intend to shoot:

Mainly landscape? People? If yes, close portraits or with more surroundings? Street? Buildings? Inside buildings? Using a tripod much or mainly handheld? Are you planning to actually shoot in the rain?

 

I have at least 3 ideas and - like milandro also suggested - all of them include two bodies.

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I'm with the people who say you want to think in terms of something failing eventually - so pick your system to keep working minus any one component.
 
I've used the X-T1 and 18-135 in some pretty hostile conditions (airsoft skirmishes in the rain, for example) - and they worked out nicely, so I'd start with that combo, and plan to use it for basically everything. I really recommend the medium sized grip expansion with the 18-135; I find it rather unwieldy without. Also spare batteries, etc. Both of the above are probably available off-brand by now. Add a medium Gorrilapod and you've got some serious long exposure capabilities (it clamps to the handlebar of a bike lying on the ground rather nicely, for example), which means the only capability you're missing is low-light action, and ultrawide.
 
Everything else is your backup. Personally I'd get a second-hand X-E2, and a 35/1.4. The X-E2 has the same sensor, and is pretty cheap and durable - it's my suggestion for the cheapest/lightest available backup to your X-T1. Swap the 35 for another focal length if your "if I had to do everything with just one prime lens" preference is different, but given you listed it in both sets, I suspect it isn't. That's your low-light action lens, your "people" lens, your low-profile lens, and your "I could live with just this if I had to" lens. 
 
I'd skip the ultrawide. It's a specialist, situational lens you shouldn't be using frequently... and you're trying to make a durable and flexible kit on a tight time and space/weight budget. If you can't do without, then try to squeeze it into your budget.
 
Buying the X-T1 and 18-135 new as a bundle, the X-E2 and 35/1.4 second-hand, a Gorillapod and some top-notch cards, plus off-brand handgrip and spare batteries... you should easily get change out of 2000 GBP. Think about bags. Personally, I'd expect to have the X-E2 and one lens buried in your bags, so get something waterproof to wrap them in, and use clothes for padding - and then the X-T1 with the other lens ready for action. If I wanted to keep it ready all-day, every day, I'd be using a Mindshift Ultralight Camera Cover (the "10" size fits that combo fine) and a really good strap to leave it attached to me and ready for action, but protected a bit from the world... but maybe you're a holster person, or prefer a small bag attached to your belt. Either way, I really wouldn't recommend a dedicated camera bag to hold all of the kit... unless that is also going to double as the thing you keep all your valuables in when you have parked up for the evening, and are leaving most of your kit in a hostel or whatever. I'd still pick it for that purpose first, and add a camera insert if appropriate.
 
Think about how you're editing and backing up photos as you go. A Nexus 7 or similar would be the lightest sane choice, connecting via wireless, backing photos up immediately, having respectable editing capabilities, and letting you upload everything to the cloud whenever you hit wireless. You'll want to upload to the cloud on a regular basis no matter what - but the tablet will let you post updates to social media, keep in touch with people, etc. (If you're expecting to take hundreds of photos a day, it will be too painful to edit on - at that point you're looking at an ultrabook ).

TL;DR: XT-1, X-E2, 18-135, 35/1.4
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A new X-E2 cost exactly the same (In my neck of the woods) as the X-T10. The XE-2 might get an update in several months ( but they haven’t told us which update it would be!) I certainly stick to the X-T10 ( the camera of of the future) rather than hang on the the camera of the past.

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I'll write my thoughts but they aren't really specific without knowing what you'll want to shoot. I'd definitely go for two cameras.

 

VERSION 1

- 2 times X-T10

- 18-135 bolted on one camera

- 35 bolted on the other

 

Pro: lighter (~1.5kg), simpler

Cons: if the zoom breaks, you're left with only one prime and two cameras for it

 

 

VERSION 2

- 2 times X-T10

- XC 16-50 kit lens (usually on one body)

- Tokina 11-16 plus adapter for Nikon F mount (replaces the 35 when I'm on the road and more likely to do landscapes)

- XF 35 (usually on the second body)

- For more reach I would add a Nikkor 100 2.8 Series E, it's really cheap, optically great and light (get's put on when I want some close up portraits)

 

Pro: more versatile (especially at the wide end), not so dependent on one zoom that could break

Cons: heavier (~2kg), more objects

 

 

Both would set you back pretty much 2000 gbp. Getting some stuff used (which I would definitely do!) would make it cheaper and leave some room to breathe if you still need bag, tripod, cards etc.

At the long end you can zoom using your feet without changing the perspective much. With WA that's a different story so I would opt for a WA zoom.

 

Concerning WR I would not worry too much about it. Most people when they've been on the bike all day and are soaking wet tend to look for a dry place to stay rather than getting out their camera to shoot the monsoon. I haven't heard of many people having problems with the lack of WR in older Fuji cameras so I believe with a bit of care and maybe a rain cover you should be good to go. Getting an X-T1 and 18-135 will either limit you to taking one camera (which I wouldn't do) or you could only buy another X-T10 with XF 27. That would make you very dependant on the zoom and also you wouldn't have any fast aperture lens with you.

Instead of getting the X-T1 I would rather risk ruining one X-T10 in exchange for being able to bring more lens choices.

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If the X-T10 would be as cheap as an X-E2, then certainly go for that. I only suggested the X-E2 because I've seen them cheap second-hand, recently, and it's only being carried as a backup.

 

I'm not aware that the 18-135 is prone to breaking, and mine certainly feels plenty solid. I figure any breakages are going to be repaired/replaced, but it could take the OP weeks to sort that out, given they're travelling.

 

WR... personal preference, obviously, but I believe it goes with a generally more solid construction. Pretty sure I'd have killed my X-T1 by now if it didn't have WR (I shoot in moderate rain pretty regularly, and it's also landed in deep mud). The only thing to watch so far is water getting behind the first layer of the viewfinder screen and condensing. Doesn't break anything, but it's a royal pain.

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A weather resistant body is paramount when shooting in places where conditions might not allow a non WR to work ( rain forest or desert).

 

In conditions like this would never risk sensor dirt by changing lenses and the WR lens would never leave the WR body.

 

Having one body alone would be suicidal in places where there are no shops to repair your cameras.

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I got my gear with the same consideration with some street photography extra:

 

X-T1 with 18-135:

Way too pratical to passup this combo and the weather sealing allowed me to take it out on a trip to Taiwan, it wasn't during the typhoon season but still went up hicking in the montain and I sure was happy to have the weather sealing on body and lens.

 

I added the the 35mm F1.4 for low light situations and because I love the "nifty fifty" and tossed in the 27mm F2.8 for streets.

 

With that setup, I was able to take close of everything I wanted. Just missed the 10mm to 24mm wide angle zoom in the bag to cover really everything I would shoot.

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I have had 2 X-T1's  I sold the kit one that came with the 18-55mm with very non-responsive four way buttons and bought another X-T1 with the 18-135mm lens.  The buttons were a little more clicky and workable.  For a Long Trip this is all I would take. If I want a small camera, I also have a X30 which is really remarkable and very familiar to me since it is a Fuji X camera.  That's it for traveling.  I have a 35mm 1.4, a 10-24mm and a 27mm, but I would leave them home, I only use them rarely and they are not worth the weight.  Just add a nice iPad Air 2 and you should be ready for anything out there.

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I have had 2 X-T1's  I sold the kit one that came with the 18-55mm with very non-responsive four way buttons and bought another X-T1 with the 18-135mm lens.  The buttons were a little more clicky and workable.  For a Long Trip this is all I would take. If I want a small camera, I also have a X30 which is really remarkable and very familiar to me since it is a Fuji X camera.  That's it for traveling.  I have a 35mm 1.4, a 10-24mm and a 27mm, but I would leave them home, I only use them rarely and they are not worth the weight.  Just add a nice iPad Air 2 and you should be ready for anything out there.

 

That's a really good idea, didn't think of that. The X30 is a very fun little camera and good bang for the buck. It might lose on the spec sheet compared to LX100 and RX100III but those are also more expensive. And for someone already using the X system it would make sense.

 

In that case (and because most here are suggesting to go with WR) I might go with

- X-T1 with 18-135

- X30

- 35 f1.4 (would definitely take one fast lens) or 12 f2 if that is more important to you than fast aperture.

 

You would need to carry different batteries for both but apart from that it seems like a nice setup for 2000gbp. Weight would be about 1.5kg.

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That's a really good idea, didn't think of that. The X30 is a very fun little camera and good bang for the buck. It might lose on the spec sheet compared to LX100 and RX100III but those are also more expensive. And for someone already using the X system it would make sense.

 

In that case (and because most here are suggesting to go with WR) I might go with

- X-T1 with 18-135

- X30

- 35 f1.4 (would definitely take one fast lens) or 12 f2 if that is more important to you than fast aperture.

 

You would need to carry different batteries for both but apart from that it seems like a nice setup for 2000gbp. Weight would be about 1.5kg.

Why would anyone need X30 duplicating X-T1+18-135?!

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Why would anyone need X30 duplicating X-T1+18-135?!

 

That's exactly why: replicating so you have a backup.

Taking the initial plan of the TO he would use X-T1, 18-135, 35 and Samyang 12. If the zoom breaks (can happen) or gets stolen (dito) he will be left with a 35 mm and a 12 mm lens selection. That is anything but flexible.

 

Since almost everybody here suggests going with the X-T1 and 18-135 he won't be able to afford another ILC body. But leaving for two years with only one body is something I (and several other posters) wouldn't suggest doing. So the X30 would be an affordable backup. Talking about an actual backup here, not as a second body used simultaneously.

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My kit would be X-T1, 16-55 WR (or 18-135 WR) and one fast prime. The 35 is the best all purpose low light lens, the 18 in my mind is best for inconspicuous street shooting. Take at least 3 batteries, a few lens pen kits, at least a 16GB card a day and for the rest, try to travel light.

 

I travel a lot, and my all year kit would be only an X100T with the TCL, or an X-T1 with a 16-55 and a fast prime. Never would I carry two bodies and I would try to limit lens switching as much as possible.

 

Focus on experiences and people, the shots will follow :-)

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Tom's battery comment brings up a good point about accessories. There is a third party battery charger available on Amazon that uses USB. I don't know how well they work, but to cut weight you could potentially pick up one of those and use your phone or other cords and power adapters with it. Or use the old iphone/mac power brick plug trick with the fuji charger. Eliminating that long cord for the fuji charger is almost enough weight and space for a small prime!

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 at least a 16GB card a day

 

How much do you shoot on vacation?

 

OP: You mentioned one body or the other. As much as I'd like two bodies, I can't afford it, and have traveled with one. Since weather sealing is a priority for you, I definitely suggest getting the X-T1 and 18-135. That will cover a lot of ground, so if there are focal lengths you'd only use sometimes (for me, it's longer ones - I enjoy shooting wildlife but don't get to do it much) the 18-135 will cover most of them. You already listed the primes you would get, so that's covered already.

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I like the idea of two bodies - I would suggest the X-T1 with the 18-135 which would serve for most of your shots, but add the X-T10 and a 27mm for street shooting and having a camera with you at all times as it is nearly a pocket package.  I checked Adorama prices and it comes to $3147 - but that didn't seem to have any deal prices and there are usually some discount prices available.  But that gives you two bodies (a spare will be a good thing) and an all around lens and a street photography lens.

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Hey there,

 

I'd like to start by saying how amazing your trip sounds! I recently did a very similar trip with my wife, 11 months through Asia and NZ (we are from Australia) and always getting motorbikes in pretty much every town we went to (we rode from HCMC to Hanoi and up to the border of China and Vietnam on a bike we bought there too). It was an incredible trip that you will really enjoy!

 

During the trip we went through countless downpours, rode on dirt roads, 40 degree temperatures to negative temperature in Japan. All that time I had the X-Pro1 (not weather sealed), 14mm, 35mm and 55-230mm and the fuji EF-42 flash (which I didn't use once).

 

The only change to this came late in the trip where I bought a 10-24 as I just found myself limited by the 14mm at the wide end (I like to shoot WIDE haha)

 

I found this combo to be perfect for what I wanted, the 14mm and 35mm were my staples and I swapped between them for 95% of the trip. I only used the 55-230 for specific things such as shooting some surf shots and a few other things.

 

I feel like a single camera body with 3 lenses would be more than enough for you on the trip, weather sealing would be nice but having been there and done that, I can say it isn't a must. The little EF-8 flash that comes with the X-T1 would be handy to have in times when you need a small flash (the EF-42 was just too big for me to bother with it)

 

If it was me, I'm not sure on prices there, but I'd try and get:

 

X-T1 or X-T10 whatever suits the budget
10-24mm for landscape and to have on when riding

35mm for low light and general street shots

55-230mm (the cheap one) just for that extra bit of reach

 

Those along with 1 or 2 16gb cards, 4 or so batteries (charging can only be done so often sometimes) I think would be the perfect travel kit (for me anyway haha)

 

You can take a look at my shots from the trip at http://www.jaidephotography.com/gallery.html

 

Also if you like you can read our travel blogs and country guides at http://newlynomads.weebly.com

 

If you have any questions on countries you want to ask I'd be stoked to help you so just send me a message!

 

Justin

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A lot of this depends on what is most important to you, the trip, or the photos. On a bike, every gear choice is about compromise.

 

I know you're committed to Fuji, however if I were going on that trip I would leave my beloved Fuji gear behind and get an OM-D EM-5 and 2 or 3 zuiko pro zooms. I would probably also take something like a Sony rx100 or Panasonic lx100 for backup/pocket, or another Oly body.

 

I love my Fuji gear but two years on a bike the size /weight advantage of Oly is going to make a real difference. The zuiko pro lenses are tiny jewels of awesome, and the whole rig is weather sealed and In-body stabilized and will cover just about every situation.

 

You're investing years of your life on this. The heavier/larger the gear you take, the more your gear will become part of the memory, and almost certainly not in a good way. That is not what I would want from a once in a lifetime trip like that personally.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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