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X-T1/X-T10 and the Weather Sealing... just a Gimmick or a Must Have Feature?


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I will make outing now: I always considered weather sealing more as a gimmick. First, becuase I usually don't shoot under the rain, and second becuase even in case of rain, I was always pretty confident that my camera can handle it (as you can see in the image).

 

I don't know if in the long term there could be any damage, but for sure my X-E2 worked perfectly until the day I jumped into a river with it (turned on!) in order to save my life (story here).

 

I say this, because one of the key differences between the X-T1 and X-T10 is weather sealing.

 

So feel free to tell us what you think about weather sealing... is it something you absolutely need, a nice to have feature but no deal-breaker, or is weather sealing something that does not influence your buying decision at all?

 

Long story short:  is the lack of weather sealing on the X-T10 a deal-breaker for you?

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I am not in ‚Äú adventure shooting‚ÄĚ, so it is not a game changer, for me, but It might help with, sensor dust for the common user or when using a scuba case ( where water can always find its way although not pressurized enough to actually enter a camera that has water sealing ( and a lens to match!).

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I like to photograph when it's raining or snowing.

With my first X100 i was quite often outdoors on rainy days. I thought that "a bit" of rain is no problem for the X100. Then, after a rather wet New Year's Eve night - this was more then "a bit" of rain -  shutter button and on/off switch unity stopped working reliable; the cam was sent to service and they had to exchange shutter button / on/off switch unity. 

Since then i've become more cautious using X100 (and later X-Pro1) in rainy situations.

This said, i was really glad to hear when it was clear that the X-T1 will be weather sealed. This "feature" amongst others was a good reason for me to exchange my X-Pro1 with an X-T1.

 

Concerning the X-T10: It is a very nice cam! I like it. (I had it in my hands shortly.) I don't think the lack of weather sealing is a deal-breaker.

But i won't buy it. (I have more than enough equipememnt.)

 

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The only times I'm shooting in the rain or any kind of humid condition is when I'm chasing birds of prey, which the Fuji cameras are not good for anyway. That's the one thing I still keep a Canon DSLR for.

So, since my Fujis only get used indoors‚ÄĒtypically in a studio‚ÄĒand rarely outdoors unless the weather is clear and mild, no, weather sealing on a Fuji doesn't mean anything to me. The only negative environment my Fujis are ever subjected to is the occasional bit of stage smoke, though considering that's yet to cause problems with my non-sealed X100S, non-sealed lenses, non-sealed medium format camera and the times I've used less rugged DSLRs, I don't consider it to be any threat to any other non-sealed body or lens by any manufacturer.

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Weather sealing opens up possibilities.

Bad weather makes for good pictures.

The more your camera can cope with what the world throws at it, the more interesting things you can capture with it.

I have a weather-sealed XT1 and 16mm WR lens - but there's things I won't do with it - like playing with my dogs in a pond. For that I'll set up a GoPro camera on a tripod just above the water, set to stills. And if they knock it over, they knock it over.

533ca2e33f2b5b40ccfc6863cab59e32.jpg

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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I was out today shooting an equestrian event in poor conditions and I was very thankful for the weather sealing on the X-T1. If I wasn't shooting professionally I would have been tucked up somewhere dry, and not freezing in the rain!

 

Personally I feel that weather sealing is a nice extra for amateurs, but a must-have for most working pros. I think the X-T10 is a great camera, but the lack of weather sealing and (more importantly) the tiny buffer and inability to add a vertical grip kill it as a camera for professional use.

 

Being able to quickly swap in new batteries is a vital part of professional life, particularly with the comparably poor battery life on Fuji models. For this reason alone the X-T1 is a better choice for working pros.

 

All that said, if I were an amateur shooting for myself I'd choose the X-T10 - cheaper and fully functional, and it looks good to boot.

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Personally I feel that weather sealing is a nice extra for amateurs, but a must-have for most working pros. I think the X-T10 is a great camera, but the lack of weather sealing and (more importantly) the tiny buffer and inability to add a vertical grip kill it as a camera for professional use.

 

 

Are you sure you couldn't say anything else to dampen my enthusiasm for the XT-10?

 

NO BG??? Have hands that can support a 1Dx like it was built to fight MY hands alone!!!

 

And it can't take a BG and is SMALLER than an X-Pro 1???

 

Think I could be in trouble here...

 

I've had a 5D2 fail in the rain, so appreciate the limits of 'weather sealing on digital kit' - but you need to be able to hold the camera...

Back to those nice people at WEX to discuss my options me thinks...

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I was shooting in much less snow that this with an X-E2. Some snow melted and seeped into the back of the camera causing a few functions to stop working. Sent it to Fuji repair and was told that Fuji will  not even work on a water-damaged camera. Had to trash it or use it as an expensive bookend.  

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Not... but still pondering it. As a sailor, I've seen the marine environment break down every sort of weather sealing - within a period of time and exposure. On a new and "babied" camera, I'd trust the weather sealing. On an older camera that's spent a long time outdoors, eventually the sealing will break down. Especially if that water has salt in it... and especially if you're in the habit of testing it ... "just for yucks".

 

So for me, I tend to baby equipment anyway. You can weather seal it all you want... that's just insurance in my view. Do I want to test it and rely on it? Absolutely not. So this begs the question. I've opted not to spring for the X-T1 at an extra $300 for a body relative to the X-T10. Would I prefer to have a WR (note resistant not sealed is the actual term) ? Sure. I'm a belt AND suspenders kind of guy, and if you give it to me, I'll take it. Paying extra for it.... choice of a $800 brand new X-T10 with a full warranty vs. a $900 Used X-T1 or $1,100 New-on-sale... came down to newer operating system at a lower price.

 

Benefits of the X-T1 that X-T10 doesn't have? ISO dial. Yes I miss will that, but my X-E1 doesn't have that either. UHS-II interface for fast memory cards. Yes, I will miss that, but with the right card... not much. WR? This just isn't the top of the list. So for now.... have a pre-order in with B&H... but for $200 more, "upgrading" to USED without a warranty or $350 extra for NEW... I'm just not sure it isn't better saved for now and applied either to the "next" (X-T2 as originally intended in my case) or a lens (90mm fixed or long telephoto when it comes out).

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I've always felt that environmental sealing is more important to protect against dust than water. As long as I'm not caught out in one of our regular typhoons it's not too hard with a little bit of care attention to keep things dry, but it's just about impossible to keep them away from fine dust. I discovered this with my very first digital camera, a Canon A520 which I bought before I moved to Tirana in Albania. Like many post communist cities Tirana was one giant construction site with cement dust blowing in the wind, On top of that our 'road' wasn't a paved road but a very wide dirt track, plied by lorries bringing cement to the local constructions. About six months after I got there the lens cover started to stick. I cleaned it as best I could regularly but in the end I had to manually open the blades when I turned it on. I can't imagine the damage that this kind of fine dust could do to a camera's innards. If the sealing works against this then, in some parts of the world at least, it definitely has a value. 

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 I thought that "a bit" of rain is no problem for the X100. Then, after a rather wet New Year's Eve night - this was more then "a bit" of rain -  shutter button and on/off switch unity stopped working reliable

Similar thing with my X100s.  We were hiking through the pouring rain on the Île d'Ouessant last year and the camera became damp inside the bag (I had neglected to put the bag inside its raincover and the fabric was soaked).  When I took it out, it wouldn't respond.  Fortunately, it came back from the dead the following day and has worked flawlessly since.  Still, I'm waiting for the 35/2 WR to use on days like this, so that I can take the XT1, even when the 16-55 might feel too heavy for a long hike.

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I treat weather sealing on my X-T1 as insurance against missed shots or opportunities. If the weather isn't great, I can still grab my camera and fire off a few shots here and there without hesitation, but for real protection from the being out in the elements for a period of time I rely on my Billingham. My bag is the real protection from the elements that I count on and trust. The weather sealing simply helps prevent the hesitation which makes you miss that perfect shot.

 

I've been thinking about getting a second camera body for both backup and perhaps dual situations while traveling. Maybe put the 27mm or 18mm on the second body for compact street shooting without swapping lenses. I'm leaning against the weather sealing for this second body.

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Benefits of the X-T1 that X-T10 doesn't have? ISO dial. Yes I miss will that, but my X-E1 doesn't have that either. UHS-II interface for fast memory cards. Yes, I will miss that, but with the right card... not much. WR? This just isn't the top of the list.

Personally I'd say that the smaller viewfinder, smaller buffer and inability to take a battery grip are bigger issues than the ones you've quoted.

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I would not rely on resistance against salt water and sand dust either. However it can save the day against mud / dirty hands/ quite a bit of rain / a water bottle leaking in your backpack / shit. All things that happen when you're on multi-days hike.

 

A rain cover eventually fails, too, in Scotland at some point.

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Speaking of Catchwords

As long as we're on the subject of catchwords, it's probably worth tackling 'Weather Sealed' or 'Weather Resistant' next. Many people seem to believe that means 'waterproof'. When you take lenses apart all day you find out it usually means 'we put a strip of foam rubber behind the front and rear elements and scotch tape over the access holes under the rubber rings'.

http://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2013/12/assumptions-expectations-and-plastic-mounts

 

65% gimmick, 35% must have. I've dropped an XP1 in the snow:

8446893416_5885d064b0_z.jpg

...been caught in summer storms, misted with salt spray, and a dollop of strawberry ice cream right on the shutter speed turret. Never stopped ticking until it was stolen.

 

Weather sealing is a nice to have, and it's better than nothing, but you can't let it give you a false sense of bravado. And a quality camera will survive a lot more than most people think. The extra survivability that weather sealing gives is already when you're in the 'warranty voided/this image is might cost the camera' zone.

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