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Fuji X-T10, with the 60mm over the 35mm...

x-t10 60mm 35mm fuji x-t10 fujinon 35mm fujinon 60mm fuji x100s x100s

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#1 thesilenceofthelens

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 12:36 PM

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So I've ordered the Fuji X-T10 along with the Fujinon 60mm 2.4 (to coincide with the X100s and TCL-X100 that I already own) in order to finally start second shooting for local documentary wedding photographers. Obviously, I would love more lenses but money is VERY tight at the moment and this was the absolute max budget I could afford until after the summer. It worked out at £670 overall ($984), including a cashback offer Fuji currently have on bodies in the UK. I would LOVE a 56mm but they are more than double the price of the 60mm.

 

I was torn between the 35mm and 60mm as they were approx the same price, ish, but I decided to go with the 60mm as it is obviously a much different focal length to the X100s.

 

My question is, have I made the right decision? The order has been placed and now buyers remorse has set in! Surely the Fuji X100s (with or without the TCL) would be just too close to the 35mm? Right? Surely the variety of the X100 along with the X-T10 + 60mm give me better options going forward for (documentary) wedding photography?

 

Also, does anyone have any experience with the 60mm on the X-T10?

 

Thanks guys, I appreciate any advice/feedback/experience you have for me.


Edited by thesilenceofthelens, 26 May 2016 - 01:09 PM.


#2 Larry Bolch

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 08:31 PM

If you need only one eye to be in focus, the 56mm f/1.2 is essential. However, the fad for paper thin depth of field is approaching cliché status and hardly appropriate for most documentary work. The 60mm f/2.4 is a brilliant lens with powerful close focusing ability. It is a lens I use a great deal with my X-Pro1. I don't see how the experience would differ significantly with the X-T10 specifically. It is essential in my kit. The X100 is a nice compliment, specially in troublesome light, where its fill-flash capability can be vital. 


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#3 thesilenceofthelens

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 09:44 AM

If you need only one eye to be in focus, the 56mm f/1.2 is essential. However, the fad for paper thin depth of field is approaching cliché status and hardly appropriate for most documentary work. The 60mm f/2.4 is a brilliant lens with powerful close focusing ability. It is a lens I use a great deal with my X-Pro1. I don't see how the experience would differ significantly with the X-T10 specifically. It is essential in my kit. The X100 is a nice compliment, specially in troublesome light, where its fill-flash capability can be vital. 

 

Ah that's great, thanks Larry! I've never been one for those ridiculously dreamy depth of fields, especially with documentary photography, so I'm hoping the 60mm will be more suited to me. Thanks again



#4 darknj

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 11:06 AM

The XF 60 lens is slower when compared to the 35 F1.4, the AF is even more noticeable, specially in low light with the 35 F2 version.

 

That aside, I love the 60mm for general portraiture work and used as a small tele for reporting. Do take into consideration that it is really not a fast AF lens, it's among the slow ones, like the 56 F1.2. So if you plan on taking fast moving subject, you will be very disappointed with it.

 

For the rest, I find to be just right for general purpose photography where the speed is not a factor, it even works on the street if you have a bit of time to frame your shot.



#5 JRphoto

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 06:28 PM

I have the feeling that the 35mm(53mm eq.) has a more useful focal length for documentary wedding photography than the 60mm(90mm eq.), maybe a bit tight in some occasions, besides f1.4 being very welcome in low light. I love the XF60mm, but the XF35mm f1.4 is also a superb lens. In fact the XF35mm focal length is really very near the X100S+TCL focal length (33mm, 50mm eq.). With time, I would have both.


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#6 Tikcus

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Posted 27 May 2016 - 10:27 PM

I have just finished a series of studio headshots (about 24 hours of total shooting) using the XT-10 and XF60 exclusively.

 

Make sure you update the firmware on the camera and the lens, the latest firmware makes the lens a lot faster to focus.

 

I have no issues with the focus speed, it focuses pretty much instantly in the studio (it was pretty dim, and I was shooting at F/11 ISO 200, 1/180)

 

The only time I have ever noticed the focus being slow is if the lens misses focus and goes through the entire focus range (and being a macro lens this is a big range), or for macro work. In my experience no macro lens focuses lightning fast.

 

Outside i've never felt the lens was slow, but my normal lens for general photography is the 35 F/1.4, and have never tried to track a fast moving object with the XF60

 

hope this helps


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#7 Aswald

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Posted 30 May 2016 - 03:55 AM

On the X-Pro2, the XF60 is great.

 

The AF performance of the X-T10 and X-Pro2 is very similar. It's very usable.

 

The only real advantage of the 56 over the 60 is perhaps, low light and close up bokeh. Other than that, the 60 is a beautiful lens.

 

With the 35, I find that you'd have to shoot much closer. At times, it may be difficult in a wedding.



#8 thesilenceofthelens

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 10:36 AM

On the X-Pro2, the XF60 is great.

 

The AF performance of the X-T10 and X-Pro2 is very similar. It's very usable.

 

The only real advantage of the 56 over the 60 is perhaps, low light and close up bokeh. Other than that, the 60 is a beautiful lens.

 

With the 35, I find that you'd have to shoot much closer. At times, it may be difficult in a wedding.

 

 

I have just finished a series of studio headshots (about 24 hours of total shooting) using the XT-10 and XF60 exclusively.

 

Make sure you update the firmware on the camera and the lens, the latest firmware makes the lens a lot faster to focus.

 

I have no issues with the focus speed, it focuses pretty much instantly in the studio (it was pretty dim, and I was shooting at F/11 ISO 200, 1/180)

 

The only time I have ever noticed the focus being slow is if the lens misses focus and goes through the entire focus range (and being a macro lens this is a big range), or for macro work. In my experience no macro lens focuses lightning fast.

 

Outside i've never felt the lens was slow, but my normal lens for general photography is the 35 F/1.4, and have never tried to track a fast moving object with the XF60

 

hope this helps

 

 

I have the feeling that the 35mm(53mm eq.) has a more useful focal length for documentary wedding photography than the 60mm(90mm eq.), maybe a bit tight in some occasions, besides f1.4 being very welcome in low light. I love the XF60mm, but the XF35mm f1.4 is also a superb lens. In fact the XF35mm focal length is really very near the X100S+TCL focal length (33mm, 50mm eq.). With time, I would have both.

 

 

The XF 60 lens is slower when compared to the 35 F1.4, the AF is even more noticeable, specially in low light with the 35 F2 version.

 

That aside, I love the 60mm for general portraiture work and used as a small tele for reporting. Do take into consideration that it is really not a fast AF lens, it's among the slow ones, like the 56 F1.2. So if you plan on taking fast moving subject, you will be very disappointed with it.

 

For the rest, I find to be just right for general purpose photography where the speed is not a factor, it even works on the street if you have a bit of time to frame your shot.

 

 

Thanks for your input guys, I appreciate it. I took the X-T10 and 60mm out for a spin on Sunday evening, and am absolutely in love with it in all honesty. Especially for candid portraits, it renders beautifully.

 

After coming from the X100s for SO long, it has taken quite a bit of getting used to the different focal length... and the X-T10 is just SO MUCH fun to shoot with. Apart from that, I've found auto focus to be perfectly acceptable and back-button manual focus to be great too. I can't wait to see how it performs at a wedding this weekend (as a guest) especially for candid moments, as that will shape things going forward into second-shooting.

 

I can see why so many portrait photographers rave over this lens, it really is magical.


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#9 Titan_66

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 11:51 AM

Iam looking forward for your feedback ! Iam thinking about this lens too. I also have x-t10. XF 60 seems to be the perfect compromise, not too expensive and you can use it for macro (1:2) and portraits. I guess since fuji released x-t10/x-t1 FW4 - very bad AF is the history....



#10 sir_c

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Posted 03 July 2016 - 07:47 PM

The XF 60 is an excellent piece of optic. Very nice bokeh and love the colours.

Damien Lovegrove did some testing last year, showing the differences of various lenses, including the 60: http://www.prophoton...pd-50-140-zoom/



#11 M3ph15t

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Posted 04 July 2016 - 10:42 PM

Do take into consideration that it is really not a fast AF lens, it's among the slow ones, like the 56 F1.2. So if you plan on taking fast moving subject, you will be very disappointed with it.

 

For the rest, I find to be just right for general purpose photography where the speed is not a factor, it even works on the street if you have a bit of time to frame your shot.

 

 

I guess maybe we shouldn't rely too much on the autofocus system. It's a nice tool, but that's it. I know guys who shoot wildlife (flying birds, leopards and such) on Film, manually with a Nikon FE2 and a Motordrive (I've been told that the MD is just for comfort).

I myself shoot concerts with a X-T1 plus a 135mm Pentacon from the 70's and it's working fine for me. For documentary work, I use a Takumar 55mm from the late 60's and it's working fine and fast.

 

My point is: every lens is fast and bright enough if you know how to handle it. That's the whole magic. You can shoot everything if you can foresee what could happen and get yourself ready for this moment.

I myself tend to shoot pictures, even if they are slightly off focus, if I want to capture that moment. Sometimes that's something special, a slightly unsharp picture in a so 'perfect' world. And of course you can try to sharpen it via Lightroom ;-)


Edited by M3ph15t, 04 July 2016 - 10:44 PM.




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: x-t10, 60mm, 35mm, fuji x-t10, fujinon 35mm, fujinon 60mm, fuji x100s, x100s

 
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