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Hi,

after some lens change in the woods i have discovered strange artifacts on my photos.

Is there any who can discover what's the problem?

It is X T20.

Maybe some moisture had come inside ?


Thanks
 

jpg-xt-20_04.jpg

raf-xt-20_04.jpg

Edited by komodo
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This is possible of course.

Because I am wearing my camera on Peak design capture on my backpack there is a chance to switch camera on or off accidentally.

But I don't think this would be the first time I have changed my lens while camera turned on. And I have had the Fuji X for 5 years. (X T10 before).

 

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That looks like a bit of static discharge which can happen in the dry times of winter when clothing rubs against each other. The camera being on while the lens is off would make the sensor an easy pathway for the static to move to ground.

If this not still happening then the sensor should have recovered.

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, jerryy said:

That looks like a bit of static discharge which can happen in the dry times of winter when clothing rubs against each other. The camera being on while the lens is off would make the sensor an easy pathway for the static to move to ground.

If this not still happening then the sensor should have recovered.

I don't think that's the case. It's still there and now I am waiting for the response from the Fuji service center. They have asked me to sent them some RAWs to inevstigate what's going on.
I think that if it'll be something about static it'll be gone by now. It is five weeks since it firtst appeared and nothing changed.
 

I have added 200% zoom of the affected RAW. If you click on it it seems really strange.

200.png

Edited by komodo
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Not static like radio static but static electricity. It is the bane of electronic equipment, it can easily fry a circuit, it is like a lightning strike. Since you say it is still happening, your sensor may have gotten zapped.

p.s. I hope that I am wrong about this.

Edited by jerryy
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36 minutes ago, jerryy said:

Not static like radio static but static electricity. It is the bane of electronic equipment, it can easily fry a circuit, it is like a lightning strike. Since you say it is still happening, your sensor may have gotten zapped.

p.s. I hope that I am wrong about this.

🙂I know what static electricity is. I am an electrician by chance. So i don't think it's the problem. I don't understand how could some electric discharge happen while I change the lens in the woods. There was the snow everywhere around me so everywhere some conductor.
 

BTW. Sorry if my english is bad. I am not a native .

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As I said, I hope that I am wrong.

This is why people who work on computers and other types of electronic gear wear grounding straps while doing so. They have piles of dead motherboards, memory and other chips to remind them of why.

In the winter, when the air is very dry, a static charge can quickly and easily build up on your shirt, coat, clothing. While the camera is shielded on the outside, if the camera is turned on with the lens removed, there is not as much shielding on the inside. The battery is the ground ( negative terminal ) and the sensor is a pathway surface to that ground. If the camera is off while the lens is removed, there is no path to ground, so the static electricity stays static and does not discharge.

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Have you tried pixel mapping? My understanding is this will eliminate hot or stuck pixels and replace them with nearby pixels, effectively blending out the odd ones. Worth a review in your manual or a google. I just did a quick search and didn’t see any negative posts regarding this process.

Hope this is helpful,

David

 

 

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Thanks David.

Yes I have tried pixel mapping.

But as far as I understand pixel mapping is for really dead pixels. But I have thousands of those pixels and it's not doing anything.

Now I am waiting for some info from Fuji service center so I will see what's going on.

Cheers.


 

 

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