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jerryy

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A Rose by another name ... is a Screaming Skull!

NGC 7789, a star cluster located in the Cassiopeia Constellation, is called Caroline's Rose Cluster in honor of astronomer Caroline Herschel who discovered it in 1783.

It also goes by the name The Screaming Skull Cluster. I must lack the cultural background or imagination, I have viewed this cluster through different telescopes at differing times of the season, but I just do not imagine a skull, much less a screaming one. Oh well.

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This is the equivalent of 84 minutes, 40 seconds of exposure.

It also goes by the nicknames Ghost Cluster, Star Mist Cluster, Herschel's Spiral Cluster and Crab Cluster, maybe star mist might come close as a name...

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap171115.html

https://skyandtelescope.org/online-gallery/ngc-7789-an-open-cluster-in-cassiopeia/

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jerryy

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jerryy

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NGC 281 This is the equivalent of 116 minutes exposure time. NGC 281 also goes by the name of the Pacman Nebula. https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resourc

jerryy

Rigel Jams! (Early for Halloween)

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This is the exposure equivalent of not-quite-but-almost 61 minutes. (Part One of Two)

Posted Images

The Snow Moon...

When this moon finishes growing up it will be February's Snow Moon:

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https://www.almanac.com/full-moon-names

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  • 2 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Orion has plenty of interesting parts to see; nebulas, bright glowing stars and whatnot. Orion is not the only neat thing in that part of the sky, the Rosette Nebula is close by and it is certainly neat to see. But there is also a Cone, a Christmas tree and a little variable thing as well.

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This is the equivalent of 112 minutes and lots of change worth of exposure.

NGC 2261, Hubble’s Variable Nebula is named after astronomer Edwin Hubble, who also has the big space telescope named after him:

https://hubblesite.org/contents/media/images/1999/35/904-Image.html

The Cone Nebula, NGC 2264, is actually much larger than the part seen above, the part in the images is what gives it its name:

https://www.constellation-guide.com/cone-nebula/

NASA had some fun with the Christmas Tree Cluster (The batch of stars in the “lower” part of the Cone Nebula), they rotated the image upside down — or right side up if you view it in the land down under — x-ray colored the nebula green and animated the Cluster’s stars. They have a player on their page:

https://www.nasa.gov/image-article/telescopes-illuminate-christmas-tree-cluster/

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Cropped a lot, just trying to get a vulture in the same frame as the moon.  Looks weird, but it was fun trying to get the shot......70-300 XT-5.

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Photo I took right before above, less cropped.

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Posted (edited)

Busy as a bee… Not far from Castor and Pollux in Gemini, actually just in the next constellation over to the “left” in Cancer, is Messier Object M44, The Beehive Cluster:

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M44 is fairly easy to find visually or when using binoculars or small telescopes. This is the equivalent of 58 minutes of exposure.

https://science.nasa.gov/mission/hubble/science/explore-the-night-sky/hubble-messier-catalog/messier-44/

https://www.galactic-hunter.com/post/messier-44

https://www.constellation-guide.com/praesepe-m44-the-beehive-cluster/

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

sort of astro.........screwing around with my new 8mm, the stars are starting to trail, thought the tree was cool at night

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"Will you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly” * 

Back on page one of this thread, there is a post showing a quick exposure isolating IC 405, The Flaming Star Nebula. That section of the sky has so many things to see it is almost a tourist-oriented nature-viewing area.

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Some of the highlights include tadpoles, starfish, spiders, flies, pinwheels and more.

This is the equivalent of just about 56 minutes of exposure.

* The Spider And The Fly by Mary Botham Howitt

Messier Object M36 (The Pinwheel Cluster): https://www.messier-objects.com/messier-36-pinwheel-cluster/

Messier Object M38 (The Starfish Cluster): https://www.go-astronomy.com/messier.php?Messier=M38

IC 417 (The Spider Nebula): https://www.nasa.gov/image-article/spider-nebula/

NGC 1931 (The Fly Nebula): https://waid-observatory.com/ic417-2020-01-19-HOO.html

IC 410 (The Tadpoles Nebula): https://skyandtelescope.org/online-gallery/ic410-the-tadpoles-nebula-a-star-nursery/

And, of course, IC 405 (The Flaming Star Nebula): https://theskylive.com/sky/deepsky/ic405-flaming-star-nebula-object

Will the spider once again coax the fly into its parlour? Will the fly escape the machinations? Their exchange is in the sky for us to ponder...

 

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Big Bear, Big Dipper...

Every now and then one of the images I post will have an asterism, which is just a pattern in the stars that is interesting to see, but the stars have no relation to each other unlike stars in constellations. There is a famous one where both happen at the same time, the stars are in an asterism and in a constellation...

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This is a screen capture from Stellarium, with annotated star names added on top. All of the stars are part of constellation Ursa Major. The blue-ish colored lines and the white-ish colored lines connect the main constellation stars, the white-ish colored lines alone form asterisms. The orange-ish colored labels are for the stars in the two asterisms.

This is the equivalent of an 80 seconds exposure.

As a side note: Alcor and Mizar are a famous double star pair, very easy to see visually or with binoculars or telescopes.

http://stellarium.org/

https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/ursa-major-constellation/

https://www.space.com/ursa-major-constellation-great-bear

 

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But Sirius-ly Dog Star...

Of all the neat and interesting or just regular things to see in the night sky, Sirius, The Dog Star in constellation Canis Major, is considered the easiest to find, because it is the brightest star in the night sky. Being close to the Orion Constellation also helps make it easy to find. Sirius is going to continue getting brighter because it is moving toward us, in about 60,000 (60.000) years it will be a very close neighbor.

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(This is the equivalent of 28 minutes, 20 seconds worth of exposure).

If you can find Sirius up high enough in the sky, then just below it you should be able to find Messier Object M41, The Mini Beehive Cluster (related in name to Messier M44 the Beehive Cluster). Sirius and M41 are companions, tracking together across the night sky. There are some other interesting objects, clusters and nebulae in that region, probably the most famous is Sh2-308, Dolphin Head Nebula.

Canis Major (Big Dog): https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/canis-major-constellation/

Sh2-308: https://astrocat.info/sharpless-308-the-dolphin-nebula/

Sh2-304: http://galaxymap.org/cat/view/sharpless/304

Cr-121 (Collinder Open Cluster): https://in-the-sky.org/data/object.php?id=20726

Messier M41: https://www.go-astronomy.com/messier.php?Messier=M41

Sirius: https://www.space.com/21702-sirius-brightest-star.html

Sirius: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirius

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Ahoy ye hearties! Hoist ye yon Jolly Roger and Cascade away.

NGC 1502 The Jolly Roger Cluster:

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This is the equivalent of 43 minutes, 40 seconds of exposure.

NGC 1502 is a neat little cluster located in the Camelopardalis Constellation. This region of space was thought to be fairly empty by early astronomers, but as you can see, there is a lot there.

Kemble's Cascade (a.k.a. Kemble 1) is named for Father Lucian Kemble, a Canadian Franciscan friar who wrote about it to Walter Scott Houston, an author for the Sky And Telescope magazine. Houston named the asterism for Fr. Kemble and the name "stuck".

NGC 1501 is the Oyster Nebula. A longer focal length telescope is needed to bring this one into good viewing range, but it is well worth the effort.

NGC 1502: https://skyandtelescope.org/online-gallery/ngc-1502/

Camelopardalis Constellation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camelopardalis

Kemble's Cascade (and NGC 1501: The Oyster Nebula): https://www.constellation-guide.com/kembles-cascade/

Arrrrrr Matey.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Cassie's Knees...

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Some sky objects are seasonal, only appearing as signs of spring or summer or fall or winter. Others, depending on your location are circumpolar, meaning they are visible year round, never dropping below the horizon or drifting out of view.

Cassiopeia is circumpolar for many folks in the Northern Hemisphere. It also has a lot of neat clusters and nebulae. It is fairly easy to find, even in light polluted areas, it is the “W” shaped constellation, not far away from the Big Dipper.

This, just under 12 minutes equivalent exposure, is the region around Cassie’s knees. There are several Messier Objects here as well as the bright star Gamma Cassiopeia nicknamed ‘Navi’ by the astronaut Virgil Ivan “Gus” Grissom. The famous Perseid meteor showers come from this constellation’s region. 

https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/cassiopeia-constellation/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_Cassiopeiae

Screen capture using Stellarium: http://stellarium.org/

 

Edited by jerryy
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  • 2 weeks later...

playing around with the 150-600......sharper than the 70-300

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  • 3 weeks later...
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In between comas...

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This is a region of space in between Coma Cluster and Coma Berenices.

On the left is the Coma Cluster. A lot of times 'cluster' is used to name a grouping of stars, but the Coma Cluster is a grouping of galaxies.

On the right is the Coma Berenices, an asterism. This one is a tale out of Egypt. Supposedly, someone bargained for their husband's safe return from a war. He came back, so she whacked her hair off and gave up the golden locks. They were placed in the stars, an eternal symbol, known to those that tell the tale.

This is the equivalent of some few seconds less than 44 minutes of exposure.

https://science.nasa.gov/missions/hubble/nasa-hubbles-sweeping-view-of-the-coma-cluster-of-galaxies/

https://www.underthenightsky.com/constellations/coma-berenices/

Some of the notable sights in this region include:

The Needle Galaxy, NGC 4565: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap240606.html

The One Armed Spiral, NGC 4725: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150416.html

An Intermediate spiral, NGC 4559: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NGC_4559

 

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Summer Color...

In winter, Orion puts on wonderful color displays. Its nebulae make it well worth freezing your batteries off to get the beautiful images. But, …, it is not the only show in town and other winter season nebulae demand their share of your viewing time.

What about summer? Not to worry, there is plenty of sky color as well. Scorpius leads the way starting in late Spring:

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Part one of two.

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Posted (edited)

Part two of two.

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This is the equivalent of 75 minutes of exposure.

Antares, the big bright yellow star in Scorpius is surrounded by the Antares Nebula. Antares is actually a Red Giant star. Over to the right of Antares is the star cluster Messier Object M4. Above these is the Rho Ophiuchi Nebula. At the top, to the right, is the Blue Horsehead Nebula (normally it is shown flipped, both vertically and horizontally.) M4 and More! Lots of color!

https://www.star-facts.com/antares/

https://starwalk.space/en/news/antares-star

https://science.nasa.gov/mission/hubble/science/explore-the-night-sky/hubble-messier-catalog/messier-4

https://webbtelescope.org/contents/media/images/2023/128/01H449193V5Q4Q6GFBKXAZ3S03?news=true

https://www.galactic-hunter.com/post/ic4592

https://www.constellation-guide.com/constellation-list/scorpius-constellation/

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Kind Of Blue...

On page two of this thread, there is a posting of Jabbah, the star in Blue Horsehead Nebula (seen in the posting above) that gives it the blueish color.

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Closer view; IC 4592, Blue Horsehead Nebula (upside down and reversed from the posting above). This is the equivalent of 25 minutes, 15 seconds of exposure.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Polaris Trails...

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A little loose change under 50 minutes. I was wanting to get a full hour for the image, but these got in the way:

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Milky (Way) Goodness...

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This is the equivalent of 10 minutes of exposure.

1/3

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Posted (edited)

A little later. More Milk, Fewer Trees...

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This is the equivalent of 15 minutes of exposure.

2/3

 

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Posted (edited)

Pouring more Milky Way from overhead...

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This is the equivalent of 15 minutes of exposure. A little amazing to me is in this shot stack (taken with a XF14mm f2.8) the North American Nebula and the Pelican Nebula are both visible. Just Look Up!

3/3

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