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photog

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  1. Like
    photog got a reaction from Hightower196 in XF 90mm lens elements rattling   
    I have noticed the same rattle/clunk noise in my 90... the same noise the 50-140 makes when it is not on the camera. Both lenses make incredibly sharp images when on the camera and Fuji says the noise is normal behavior. As long as the image quality continues to be so outstanding, I'm not going to worry. 
     
    As a long time professional photographer who has used Canon for the better part of the last 25 years and has suffered through numerous QC issues, 1D variant body focus issues, weather sealing issues, lenses that were back/front focused on one side and not the other,  repeated IS motor failure issues, just to name a few, I have been very pleased with the high quality of the Fuji bodies (X-T1's) and the glass and how well they work right out of the box. 
     
    As far as reviewers "warning" readers about the noise, if it how the lens is supposed to operate and does not compromise image quality, there wouldn't seem to be a need to warn anyone. 
     
    I am really loving the 90... clunk and all.
  2. Like
    photog got a reaction from jlmphotos in My favorite travel photo backpack   
    A great backpack that I found recently and wanted to share with other Fuji shooters is the Lowepro Photo Hatchback 22L AW. Like many photographers, I am always on the hunt for the perfect bag, and not just one perfect bag, but the perfect bag for a variety of different shooting scenarios, each deserving of their own bag.
     
    One area I always found lacking was the photo backpack. Not the giant pack every lens and body and tripod I own style bag, but the more mirrorless, a body and a few lenses, lunch, a jacket and a bottle of water and maybe an iPad or 11" Macbook Air type bag. 
     
    Over the years I have tried quite a few... most recently I ended up with a standard backpack and used inserts for photo gear... it was bulkier that I wanted, but it worked. Then, by accident, I came across the Lowepro Photo Hatchback 22L AW bag at an REI store. It was perfect. It can hold an X-T1 and four prime lenses effortlessly. 
     
    The things that make this a great bag are:
     
    1. The camera gear is accessed through a zipped door that sits against your back when wearing the backpack. To access the gear, you can easily remove one arm from the strap, slide it to the side, and unzip and grab what you need. When you are wearing it, there is no way to access the camera equipment except for the nicely padded door which is resting against your back. There is no way a thief can get to your gear if you have it on. 
     
    2. The backpack has an upper compartment that is roomy enough for lunch, a jacket, and a 50-140 zoom (if you are so inclined). It also has a stretch pocket on both sides that will accommodate 32oz water bottles. The top area also has smaller elastic and zippered pockets inside. Great for carrying other small backpack stuff. Most camera backpacks seem to be made to carry ONLY camera gear... if you want a drink, a snack or a jacket, you have to find some other way to carry them. 
     
    3. The bag also has a separate pocket for an iPad (regular sized or mini) or an 11" Macbook air... of course the Android or Windows equivalent devices should also fit fine. 
     
    4. It has a built in rain cover that sits in a small pocket on the bottom of the bag. This protects the bag if you ever set it down somewhere that is wet (prevents water from getting into the bag) and also serves as extra padding for the camera compartment (which is in the bottom of the bag) and is especially handy if it starts raining because you can just stretch it up over the bag. 
     
    5. It looks like a nice generic travel backpack and does not look like a camera backpack at all. Many people have been surprised to see me take it off, open up the back and see cameras. It does not attract any attention at all. 
     
    6. The photo module is secured with velcro, so if you ever just need a larger backpack without the camera gear, you can easily pull it out. 
     
    7. It is only $99!! I can't remember the last time I was able to find a quality bag designed for camera gear that sold for under $100. As soon as the word camera gets put in the description of the bag, it seems to raise the price of the bag quite a bit. 
     
    The only thing that I would have liked to be different is for the straps to be a little more padded, but it is only noticeable if you really have the bag loaded down and are carrying it for a long time. This complaint might just be me, however, because another photographer I know who carries around heavier DSLR gear with the bag said the straps don't bother him at all. 
     
     
     

  3. Like
    photog got a reaction from papedo in My favorite travel photo backpack   
    Here are a bunch of images at the Lowepro website.
     
    http://store.lowepro.com/photo-hatchback-22l-aw
  4. Like
    photog got a reaction from CRAusmus in My favorite travel photo backpack   
    A great backpack that I found recently and wanted to share with other Fuji shooters is the Lowepro Photo Hatchback 22L AW. Like many photographers, I am always on the hunt for the perfect bag, and not just one perfect bag, but the perfect bag for a variety of different shooting scenarios, each deserving of their own bag.
     
    One area I always found lacking was the photo backpack. Not the giant pack every lens and body and tripod I own style bag, but the more mirrorless, a body and a few lenses, lunch, a jacket and a bottle of water and maybe an iPad or 11" Macbook Air type bag. 
     
    Over the years I have tried quite a few... most recently I ended up with a standard backpack and used inserts for photo gear... it was bulkier that I wanted, but it worked. Then, by accident, I came across the Lowepro Photo Hatchback 22L AW bag at an REI store. It was perfect. It can hold an X-T1 and four prime lenses effortlessly. 
     
    The things that make this a great bag are:
     
    1. The camera gear is accessed through a zipped door that sits against your back when wearing the backpack. To access the gear, you can easily remove one arm from the strap, slide it to the side, and unzip and grab what you need. When you are wearing it, there is no way to access the camera equipment except for the nicely padded door which is resting against your back. There is no way a thief can get to your gear if you have it on. 
     
    2. The backpack has an upper compartment that is roomy enough for lunch, a jacket, and a 50-140 zoom (if you are so inclined). It also has a stretch pocket on both sides that will accommodate 32oz water bottles. The top area also has smaller elastic and zippered pockets inside. Great for carrying other small backpack stuff. Most camera backpacks seem to be made to carry ONLY camera gear... if you want a drink, a snack or a jacket, you have to find some other way to carry them. 
     
    3. The bag also has a separate pocket for an iPad (regular sized or mini) or an 11" Macbook air... of course the Android or Windows equivalent devices should also fit fine. 
     
    4. It has a built in rain cover that sits in a small pocket on the bottom of the bag. This protects the bag if you ever set it down somewhere that is wet (prevents water from getting into the bag) and also serves as extra padding for the camera compartment (which is in the bottom of the bag) and is especially handy if it starts raining because you can just stretch it up over the bag. 
     
    5. It looks like a nice generic travel backpack and does not look like a camera backpack at all. Many people have been surprised to see me take it off, open up the back and see cameras. It does not attract any attention at all. 
     
    6. The photo module is secured with velcro, so if you ever just need a larger backpack without the camera gear, you can easily pull it out. 
     
    7. It is only $99!! I can't remember the last time I was able to find a quality bag designed for camera gear that sold for under $100. As soon as the word camera gets put in the description of the bag, it seems to raise the price of the bag quite a bit. 
     
    The only thing that I would have liked to be different is for the straps to be a little more padded, but it is only noticeable if you really have the bag loaded down and are carrying it for a long time. This complaint might just be me, however, because another photographer I know who carries around heavier DSLR gear with the bag said the straps don't bother him at all. 
     
     
     

  5. Like
    photog got a reaction from dziurek1008 in Fujinon XF 35mm F1.4 R   
    Oops... I thought you were looking for a comparison between the Fuji 35 and the Zeiss 32... I misread your original post... sorry.  The 23 is a great lens, too. I tend to shoot with the 35 much more than the 23... but like Trenton said, it really comes down to how you see and which focal length fits better with how you like to shoot. 
     
    You really can't go wrong either way.
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